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Article: T-spot.TB outperforms tuberculin skin test in predicting tuberculosis disease
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TitleT-spot.TB outperforms tuberculin skin test in predicting tuberculosis disease
 
AuthorsLeung, CC2
Yam, WC1
Yew, WW3
Ho, PL1
Tam, CM2
Law, WS2
Au, KF2
Tsui, PW2
 
KeywordsIfn-Γ Release Assay
Latent Tuberculosis Infection
Silicosis
 
Issue Date2010
 
PublisherAmerican Thoracic Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://ajrccm.atsjournals.org
 
CitationAmerican Journal Of Respiratory And Critical Care Medicine, 2010, v. 182 n. 6, p. 834-840 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/rccm.200912-1875OC
 
AbstractRationale: Silicosis is a well-recognized risk factor for tuberculosis (TB). Objectives: To compare T-Spot.TB with tuberculin skin test (TST) in predicting the development of TB. Methods:Male patients with silicosis without clinical suspicion of active TB, past history of TB, and treatment for latent TB infection (LTBI) were offered both T-Spot. TB and TST in the Pneumoconiosis Clinic of Hong Kong from 2004 to 2008, and followed prospectively until September 30, 2009, for development of TB. Measurements and Main Results: Active TB and culture- or histology-confirmed TB developed in 17 (5.5%) and 14 (4.5%) of 308 recruited subjects at an annual rate of 2,247 and 1,851 per 100,000 person-years, respectively. Active TB occurred in 7.4% (15 of 204) and 1.9% (2 of 104) of T-Spot. TB-positive and-negative subjects, respectively, whereas the corresponding figures for TST (cutoff 10 mm) were 6.4% (13 of 203) and 3.9% (4 of 205), respectively. Apositive T-Spot. TB test significantly predicted the subsequent development of active TB (relative risk, 4.50; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-19.68) and culture- or histology-confirmed TB (relative risk, 7.80; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-59.63). Consistent results were obtained after exclusion of subjects treated for LTBI and adjustment for potential confounders. TST did not significantly predict the development of active TB or culture- or histology-confirmed TB, irrespective of the cutoff values with or without exclusion of subjects treated for LTBI. Culture filtrate protein 10 spot count, but not early secretary antigenic target 6 spot count, was significantly associated with subsequent TB development. Conclusions: T-Spot. TB performs better than TST in the targeted screening of LTBI among patients with silicosis.
 
ISSN1073-449X
2012 Impact Factor: 11.041
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.892
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1164/rccm.200912-1875OC
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000282162100017
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Pneumoconiosis Compensation Fund Board
University of Hong Kong
Funding Information:

Supported by research grants from the Pneumoconiosis Compensation Fund Board and from the University of Hong Kong UDF Project-Research Centre of Emerging Infection Diseases.

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLeung, CC
 
dc.contributor.authorYam, WC
 
dc.contributor.authorYew, WW
 
dc.contributor.authorHo, PL
 
dc.contributor.authorTam, CM
 
dc.contributor.authorLaw, WS
 
dc.contributor.authorAu, KF
 
dc.contributor.authorTsui, PW
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:51:38Z
 
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:51:38Z
 
dc.date.issued2010
 
dc.description.abstractRationale: Silicosis is a well-recognized risk factor for tuberculosis (TB). Objectives: To compare T-Spot.TB with tuberculin skin test (TST) in predicting the development of TB. Methods:Male patients with silicosis without clinical suspicion of active TB, past history of TB, and treatment for latent TB infection (LTBI) were offered both T-Spot. TB and TST in the Pneumoconiosis Clinic of Hong Kong from 2004 to 2008, and followed prospectively until September 30, 2009, for development of TB. Measurements and Main Results: Active TB and culture- or histology-confirmed TB developed in 17 (5.5%) and 14 (4.5%) of 308 recruited subjects at an annual rate of 2,247 and 1,851 per 100,000 person-years, respectively. Active TB occurred in 7.4% (15 of 204) and 1.9% (2 of 104) of T-Spot. TB-positive and-negative subjects, respectively, whereas the corresponding figures for TST (cutoff 10 mm) were 6.4% (13 of 203) and 3.9% (4 of 205), respectively. Apositive T-Spot. TB test significantly predicted the subsequent development of active TB (relative risk, 4.50; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-19.68) and culture- or histology-confirmed TB (relative risk, 7.80; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-59.63). Consistent results were obtained after exclusion of subjects treated for LTBI and adjustment for potential confounders. TST did not significantly predict the development of active TB or culture- or histology-confirmed TB, irrespective of the cutoff values with or without exclusion of subjects treated for LTBI. Culture filtrate protein 10 spot count, but not early secretary antigenic target 6 spot count, was significantly associated with subsequent TB development. Conclusions: T-Spot. TB performs better than TST in the targeted screening of LTBI among patients with silicosis.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal Of Respiratory And Critical Care Medicine, 2010, v. 182 n. 6, p. 834-840 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/rccm.200912-1875OC
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1164/rccm.200912-1875OC
 
dc.identifier.epage840
 
dc.identifier.hkuros179786
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000282162100017
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Pneumoconiosis Compensation Fund Board
University of Hong Kong
Funding Information:

Supported by research grants from the Pneumoconiosis Compensation Fund Board and from the University of Hong Kong UDF Project-Research Centre of Emerging Infection Diseases.

 
dc.identifier.issn1073-449X
2012 Impact Factor: 11.041
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.892
 
dc.identifier.issue6
 
dc.identifier.pmid20508217
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77957069528
 
dc.identifier.spage834
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157605
 
dc.identifier.volume182
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherAmerican Thoracic Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://ajrccm.atsjournals.org
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subjectIfn-Γ Release Assay
 
dc.subjectLatent Tuberculosis Infection
 
dc.subjectSilicosis
 
dc.titleT-spot.TB outperforms tuberculin skin test in predicting tuberculosis disease
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Yam, WC</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Yew, WW</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Ho, PL</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Tam, CM</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Law, WS</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Au, KF</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Tsui, PW</contributor.author>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Centre for Health Protection
  3. Grantham Hospital Hong Kong