File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Agar block smear preparation: A novel method of slide preparation for preservation of native fungal structures for microscopic examination and long-term storage

TitleAgar block smear preparation: A novel method of slide preparation for preservation of native fungal structures for microscopic examination and long-term storage
Authors
Issue Date2010
Citation
Journal Of Clinical Microbiology, 2010, v. 48 n. 9, p. 3053-3061 How to Cite?
AbstractWe describe a novel method of fungal slide preparation named "agar block smear preparation." A total of 510 agar block smears of 25 fungal strains obtained from culture collections, 90 QC fungal strains, and 82 clinical fungal strains from our clinical microbiology laboratory, which included a total of 137 species of yeasts, molds, and thermal dimorphic fungi, were prepared and examined. In contrast to adhesive tape preparation, agar block smears preserved the native fungal structures, such as intact conidiophores of Aspergillus species and arrangements of conidia in Scopulariopsis brevicaulis. Furthermore, agar block smears allowed examination of fungal structures embedded in the agar, such as the ascomata with ascomal hairs in Chaetomium funicola; pycnidium of Phoma glomerata; the intercalary ovoidal chlamydospores arranged in chains of Fusarium dimerum; and the lateral, spherical chlamydospores arranged in pairs of Fusarium solani. After 1 year of storage, morphological integrity was found to have been maintained in 459 (90%) of the 510 agar block smears. After 3 years of storage, morphological integrity was found to have been maintained in 72 (71%) of the 102 smears prepared in 2006. Agar block smear preparation preserves the native fungal structures and allows long-term storage and examination of fungal structures embedded in the agar, hence overcoming the major drawbacks of adhesive tape preparation. The major roles of agar block smear should be diagnosis for difficult cases, accurate identification of fungal species for clinical management of patients and epidemiological studies, and long-term storage for transportation of slides and education purposes. Copyright © 2010, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157602
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.631
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.151
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Research Grants Council
The University of Hong Kong
Hong Kong Special Administration Region (HKSAR) Research Fund for the Control of Infectious Diseases of the Health, Welfare and Food Bureau
Funding Information:

This work was partly supported by a Research Grants Council grant; the University Development Fund, The University of Hong Kong; and the Hong Kong Special Administration Region (HKSAR) Research Fund for the Control of Infectious Diseases of the Health, Welfare and Food Bureau.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWoo, PCYen_US
dc.contributor.authorNgan, AHYen_US
dc.contributor.authorChui, HKen_US
dc.contributor.authorLau, SKPen_US
dc.contributor.authorYuen, KYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:51:36Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:51:36Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Clinical Microbiology, 2010, v. 48 n. 9, p. 3053-3061en_US
dc.identifier.issn0095-1137en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157602-
dc.description.abstractWe describe a novel method of fungal slide preparation named "agar block smear preparation." A total of 510 agar block smears of 25 fungal strains obtained from culture collections, 90 QC fungal strains, and 82 clinical fungal strains from our clinical microbiology laboratory, which included a total of 137 species of yeasts, molds, and thermal dimorphic fungi, were prepared and examined. In contrast to adhesive tape preparation, agar block smears preserved the native fungal structures, such as intact conidiophores of Aspergillus species and arrangements of conidia in Scopulariopsis brevicaulis. Furthermore, agar block smears allowed examination of fungal structures embedded in the agar, such as the ascomata with ascomal hairs in Chaetomium funicola; pycnidium of Phoma glomerata; the intercalary ovoidal chlamydospores arranged in chains of Fusarium dimerum; and the lateral, spherical chlamydospores arranged in pairs of Fusarium solani. After 1 year of storage, morphological integrity was found to have been maintained in 459 (90%) of the 510 agar block smears. After 3 years of storage, morphological integrity was found to have been maintained in 72 (71%) of the 102 smears prepared in 2006. Agar block smear preparation preserves the native fungal structures and allows long-term storage and examination of fungal structures embedded in the agar, hence overcoming the major drawbacks of adhesive tape preparation. The major roles of agar block smear should be diagnosis for difficult cases, accurate identification of fungal species for clinical management of patients and epidemiological studies, and long-term storage for transportation of slides and education purposes. Copyright © 2010, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAgaren_US
dc.subject.meshFungal Structures - Cytologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFungi - Cytologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMicroscopy - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshMycology - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshPreservation, Biological - Methodsen_US
dc.titleAgar block smear preparation: A novel method of slide preparation for preservation of native fungal structures for microscopic examination and long-term storageen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWoo, PCY:pcywoo@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLau, SKP:skplau@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailYuen, KY:kyyuen@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWoo, PCY=rp00430en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLau, SKP=rp00486en_US
dc.identifier.authorityYuen, KY=rp00366en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1128/JCM.00917-10en_US
dc.identifier.pmid20660221-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77956806756en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros182368-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77956806756&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume48en_US
dc.identifier.issue9en_US
dc.identifier.spage3053en_US
dc.identifier.epage3061en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000281480400001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWoo, PCY=7201801340en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNgan, AHY=14037517900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChui, HK=37021246700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, SKP=7401596211en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYuen, KY=36078079100en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats