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Article: Genetic identity of aminoglycoside-resistance genes in Escherichia coli isolates from human and animal sources

TitleGenetic identity of aminoglycoside-resistance genes in Escherichia coli isolates from human and animal sources
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherSociety for General Microbiology. The Journal's web site is located at http://jmm.sgmjournals.org
Citation
Journal Of Medical Microbiology, 2010, v. 59 n. 6, p. 702-707 How to Cite?
Abstract
A bacterial collection (n=249) obtained in Hong Kong from 2002 to 2004 was used to investigate the molecular epidemiology of aminoglycoside resistance among Escherichia coli isolates from humans and food-producing animals. Of these, 89 isolates were gentamicin-sensitive (human n=60, animal n=29) and 160 isolates were gentamicin-resistant (human n=107, animal n=53). Overall, 84.1% (90/107) and 75.5% (40/53) of the gentamicin-resistant isolates from human and animal sources, respectively, were found to possess the aacC2 gene. The aacC2 gene for 20 isolates (10 each for human and animal isolates) was sequenced. Two alleles were found that were equally distributed in human and animal isolates. PFGE showed that the gentamicin-resistant isolates exhibited diverse patterns with little clonality. In some isolates, the aacC2 gene was encoded on large transferable plasmids of multiple incompatibility groups (IncF, IncI1 and IncN). An IncFII plasmid of 140 kb in size was shared by one human and three animal isolates. In summary, this study showed that human and animal isolates share the same pool of resistance genes. © 2010 SGM.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157589
ISSN
2013 Impact Factor: 2.266
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.025
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Research Grant CouncilHKU 7513/06M
University Development Fund
University of I long Kong
Research Fund for the Control of Infectious Diseases (RFCID) of the Health
Welfare and Food Bureau of the I-long Kong SAR Government
Funding Information:

This work was supported by research grants from the Research Grant Council (HKU 7513/06M) and the University Development Fund Project - Research Centre of Emerging Infectious Diseases, the University of I long Kong, and the Research Fund for the Control of Infectious Diseases (RFCID) of the Health, Welfare and Food Bureau of the I-long Kong SAR Government We thank the University of Hong Kong for the Outstanding Research Postgraduate Student award to River C Wong

References
Grants

 

Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Tuen Mun Hospital
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHo, PLen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, RCen_US
dc.contributor.authorLo, SWen_US
dc.contributor.authorChow, KHen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, SSen_US
dc.contributor.authorQue, TLen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:51:30Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:51:30Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Medical Microbiology, 2010, v. 59 n. 6, p. 702-707en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-2615en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157589-
dc.description.abstractA bacterial collection (n=249) obtained in Hong Kong from 2002 to 2004 was used to investigate the molecular epidemiology of aminoglycoside resistance among Escherichia coli isolates from humans and food-producing animals. Of these, 89 isolates were gentamicin-sensitive (human n=60, animal n=29) and 160 isolates were gentamicin-resistant (human n=107, animal n=53). Overall, 84.1% (90/107) and 75.5% (40/53) of the gentamicin-resistant isolates from human and animal sources, respectively, were found to possess the aacC2 gene. The aacC2 gene for 20 isolates (10 each for human and animal isolates) was sequenced. Two alleles were found that were equally distributed in human and animal isolates. PFGE showed that the gentamicin-resistant isolates exhibited diverse patterns with little clonality. In some isolates, the aacC2 gene was encoded on large transferable plasmids of multiple incompatibility groups (IncF, IncI1 and IncN). An IncFII plasmid of 140 kb in size was shared by one human and three animal isolates. In summary, this study showed that human and animal isolates share the same pool of resistance genes. © 2010 SGM.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSociety for General Microbiology. The Journal's web site is located at http://jmm.sgmjournals.orgen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Medical Microbiologyen_US
dc.titleGenetic identity of aminoglycoside-resistance genes in Escherichia coli isolates from human and animal sourcesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHo, PL:plho@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChow, KH:khchowb@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, SS:samsonsy@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHo, PL=rp00406en_US
dc.identifier.authorityChow, KH=rp00370en_US
dc.identifier.authorityWong, SS=rp00395en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1099/jmm.0.015032-0en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77952997850en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros219373-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77952997850&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume59en_US
dc.identifier.issue6en_US
dc.identifier.spage702en_US
dc.identifier.epage707en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000278702000012-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.projectThe epidemiological relationships between CTX-M producing Escherichia coli from animal and human sources-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, PL=7402211363en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, RC=8612000100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLo, SW=36091564700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChow, KH=7202180736en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, SS=13310021400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridQue, TL=7003786628en_US

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