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Article: Ecoepidemiology and complete genome comparison of different strains of severe acute respiratory syndrome-related Rhinolophus bat coronavirus in China reveal bats as a reservoir for acute, self-limiting infection that allows recombination events

TitleEcoepidemiology and complete genome comparison of different strains of severe acute respiratory syndrome-related Rhinolophus bat coronavirus in China reveal bats as a reservoir for acute, self-limiting infection that allows recombination events
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherAmerican Society for Microbiology. The Journal's web site is located at http://jvi.asm.org/
Citation
Journal Of Virology, 2010, v. 84 n. 6, p. 2808-2819 How to Cite?
AbstractDespite the identification of severe acute respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus (SARSr-CoV) in Rhinolophus Chinese horseshoe bats (SARSr-Rh-BatCoV) in China, the evolutionary and possible recombination origin of SARSr-CoV remains undetermined. We carried out the first study to investigate the migration pattern and SARSr-Rh-BatCoV genome epidemiology in Chinese horseshoe bats during a 4-year period. Of 1,401 Chinese horseshoe bats from Hong Kong and Guangdong, China, that were sampled, SARSr-Rh-BatCoV was detected in alimentary specimens from 130 (9.3%) bats, with peak activity during spring. A tagging exercise of 511 bats showed migration distances from 1.86 to 17 km. Bats carrying SARSr-Rh-BatCoV appeared healthy, with viral clearance occurring between 2 weeks and 4 months. However, lower body weights were observed in bats positive for SARSr-Rh-BatCoV, but not Rh-BatCoV HKU2. Complete genome sequencing of 10 SARSr-Rh-BatCoV strains showed frequent recombination between different strains. Moreover, recombination was detected between SARSr-Rh-BatCoV Rp3 from Guangxi, China, and Rf1 from Hubei, China, in the possible generation of civet SARSr-CoV SZ3, with a breakpoint at the nsp16/spike region. Molecular clock analysis showed that SARSr-CoVs were newly emerged viruses with the time of the most recent common ancestor (tMRCA) at 1972, which diverged between civet and bat strains in 1995. The present data suggest that SARSr-Rh-BatCoV causes acute, self-limiting infection in horseshoe bats, which serve as a reservoir for recombination between strains from different geographical locations within reachable foraging range. Civet SARSr-CoV is likely a recombinant virus arising from SARSr-CoV strains closely related to SARSr-Rh-BatCoV Rp3 and Rf1. Such frequent recombination, coupled with rapid evolution especially in ORF7b/ORF8 region, in these animals may have accounted for the cross-species transmission and emergence of SARS. Copyright © 2010, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157580
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.606
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.347
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Research Grant CouncilHKU 7687/07M
The University of Hong Kong
The Tung Wah Group of Hospitals Fund for Research in Infectious Diseases
HKSAR Research Fund for the Control of Infectious Diseases04050232
Health, Welfare and Food Bureau
Funding Information:

This work was partly supported by the Research Grant Council Grant (HKU 7687/07M); University Development Fund and Outstanding Young Researcher Award, The University of Hong Kong; The Tung Wah Group of Hospitals Fund for Research in Infectious Diseases; the HKSAR Research Fund for the Control of Infectious Diseases (04050232) of the Health, Welfare and Food Bureau; the Providence Foundation Limited in memory of the late Lui Hac Minh; and Consultancy Service for Enhancing Laboratory Surveillance of Emerging Infectious Disease for the HKSAR Department of Health.

References
Grants

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLau, SKPen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, KSMen_US
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorShek, CTen_US
dc.contributor.authorTse, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorChoi, GKYen_US
dc.contributor.authorXu, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, CSFen_US
dc.contributor.authorGuo, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, KHen_US
dc.contributor.authorZheng, BJen_US
dc.contributor.authorWoo, PCYen_US
dc.contributor.authorYuen, KYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:51:26Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:51:26Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Virology, 2010, v. 84 n. 6, p. 2808-2819en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-538Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157580-
dc.description.abstractDespite the identification of severe acute respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus (SARSr-CoV) in Rhinolophus Chinese horseshoe bats (SARSr-Rh-BatCoV) in China, the evolutionary and possible recombination origin of SARSr-CoV remains undetermined. We carried out the first study to investigate the migration pattern and SARSr-Rh-BatCoV genome epidemiology in Chinese horseshoe bats during a 4-year period. Of 1,401 Chinese horseshoe bats from Hong Kong and Guangdong, China, that were sampled, SARSr-Rh-BatCoV was detected in alimentary specimens from 130 (9.3%) bats, with peak activity during spring. A tagging exercise of 511 bats showed migration distances from 1.86 to 17 km. Bats carrying SARSr-Rh-BatCoV appeared healthy, with viral clearance occurring between 2 weeks and 4 months. However, lower body weights were observed in bats positive for SARSr-Rh-BatCoV, but not Rh-BatCoV HKU2. Complete genome sequencing of 10 SARSr-Rh-BatCoV strains showed frequent recombination between different strains. Moreover, recombination was detected between SARSr-Rh-BatCoV Rp3 from Guangxi, China, and Rf1 from Hubei, China, in the possible generation of civet SARSr-CoV SZ3, with a breakpoint at the nsp16/spike region. Molecular clock analysis showed that SARSr-CoVs were newly emerged viruses with the time of the most recent common ancestor (tMRCA) at 1972, which diverged between civet and bat strains in 1995. The present data suggest that SARSr-Rh-BatCoV causes acute, self-limiting infection in horseshoe bats, which serve as a reservoir for recombination between strains from different geographical locations within reachable foraging range. Civet SARSr-CoV is likely a recombinant virus arising from SARSr-CoV strains closely related to SARSr-Rh-BatCoV Rp3 and Rf1. Such frequent recombination, coupled with rapid evolution especially in ORF7b/ORF8 region, in these animals may have accounted for the cross-species transmission and emergence of SARS. Copyright © 2010, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Society for Microbiology. The Journal's web site is located at http://jvi.asm.org/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Virologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshChina - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshChiroptera - Virologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDisease Reservoirs - Virologyen_US
dc.subject.meshGenome, Viralen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshPhylogenyen_US
dc.subject.meshRna, Viral - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshRecombination, Geneticen_US
dc.subject.meshSars Virus - Classification - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshSevere Acute Respiratory Syndrome - Epidemiology - Virologyen_US
dc.titleEcoepidemiology and complete genome comparison of different strains of severe acute respiratory syndrome-related Rhinolophus bat coronavirus in China reveal bats as a reservoir for acute, self-limiting infection that allows recombination eventsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLau, SKP:skplau@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailTse, H:herman@graduate.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailZheng, BJ:bzheng@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailWoo, PCY:pcywoo@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailYuen, KY:kyyuen@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLau, SKP=rp00486en_US
dc.identifier.authorityTse, H=rp00519en_US
dc.identifier.authorityZheng, BJ=rp00353en_US
dc.identifier.authorityWoo, PCY=rp00430en_US
dc.identifier.authorityYuen, KY=rp00366en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1128/JVI.02219-09en_US
dc.identifier.pmid20071579-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77649122707en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros171999-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77649122707&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume84en_US
dc.identifier.issue6en_US
dc.identifier.spage2808en_US
dc.identifier.epage2819en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000275322300017-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.relation.projectWild animal surveillance for coronavirus HKU1, a novel coronavirus associated with pneumonia in patients in Hong Kong, and potential variants of other coronaviruses that infect human-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, SKP=7401596211en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, KSM=24759122500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHuang, Y=35597414700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridShek, CT=36007758300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTse, H=7006070596en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, M=7406685232en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChoi, GKY=35423450200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXu, H=7407448207en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, CSF=25950267400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGuo, R=15839273700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, KH=7406034307en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZheng, BJ=7201780588en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWoo, PCY=7201801340en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYuen, KY=36078079100en_US

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