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Article: What have we learnt from bacterial stool culture results? a retrospective study of hospitalised gastroenteritis cases in a regional hospital in Hong Kong

TitleWhat have we learnt from bacterial stool culture results? a retrospective study of hospitalised gastroenteritis cases in a regional hospital in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsAnti-Bacterial Agents
Diarrhea
Drug Resistance
Fluoroquinolones
Issue Date2010
PublisherMedcom Limited. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkcem.com/html/publications/
Citation
Hong Kong Journal Of Emergency Medicine, 2010, v. 17 n. 1, p. 27-33 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Stool culture is one of the common investigations done for patients with gastroenteritis, and fluoroquinolones have been used frequently for suspected bacterial gastroenteritis. Objective:To study the yield of bacterial pathogens in stool culture in a local regional hospital for in-patients with gastroenteritis and the individual pathogens identified. Also, the value of stool culture and the prescription of fluoroquinolones as empirical antibiotics were reviewed. Methods: This was a retrospective study. All inpatients with the principal diagnosis of "gastroenteritis" in the year 2007 were reviewed. We excluded pregnant patients and patients under 18 years of age. Patients were divided into two age groups and data were analysed including demographics, clinical findings, admission time and culture results. Antibiotics prescription behaviour was also analysed. Results: A total of 837 adult patients fulfilled the criteria. Among them, 562 cases had their stool saved and sent for bacterial culture. Eighty-nine cases were found to have their stool cultures positive for bacteria. The identified pathogens were namely Vibrio parahaemolyticus (38.2%), Salmonella species (34.8%), Campylobacter species (11.2%), Plesiomonas species (10.1%) and Aeromonas species (3.4%) respectively. The yield of positive stool culture was 15.8%. Conclusion: Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Salmonella species were still the most common pathogens for bacterial gastroenteritis among hospitalized patients in Hong Kong, especially in the young and middle aged. Their occurrence followed a seasonal pattern. Physicians had a tendency to prescribe fluoroquinolones for cases with fever and travel history. Also, the problem of antibiotic resistance did exist. It is important for practitioners to follow local guidelines before ordering microbiological investigations on stool and prescribing empirical antibiotic treatment.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157578
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.153
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.173
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, HTen_US
dc.contributor.authorQue, TLen_US
dc.contributor.authorHo, PLen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:51:25Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:51:25Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationHong Kong Journal Of Emergency Medicine, 2010, v. 17 n. 1, p. 27-33en_US
dc.identifier.issn1024-9079en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157578-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Stool culture is one of the common investigations done for patients with gastroenteritis, and fluoroquinolones have been used frequently for suspected bacterial gastroenteritis. Objective:To study the yield of bacterial pathogens in stool culture in a local regional hospital for in-patients with gastroenteritis and the individual pathogens identified. Also, the value of stool culture and the prescription of fluoroquinolones as empirical antibiotics were reviewed. Methods: This was a retrospective study. All inpatients with the principal diagnosis of "gastroenteritis" in the year 2007 were reviewed. We excluded pregnant patients and patients under 18 years of age. Patients were divided into two age groups and data were analysed including demographics, clinical findings, admission time and culture results. Antibiotics prescription behaviour was also analysed. Results: A total of 837 adult patients fulfilled the criteria. Among them, 562 cases had their stool saved and sent for bacterial culture. Eighty-nine cases were found to have their stool cultures positive for bacteria. The identified pathogens were namely Vibrio parahaemolyticus (38.2%), Salmonella species (34.8%), Campylobacter species (11.2%), Plesiomonas species (10.1%) and Aeromonas species (3.4%) respectively. The yield of positive stool culture was 15.8%. Conclusion: Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Salmonella species were still the most common pathogens for bacterial gastroenteritis among hospitalized patients in Hong Kong, especially in the young and middle aged. Their occurrence followed a seasonal pattern. Physicians had a tendency to prescribe fluoroquinolones for cases with fever and travel history. Also, the problem of antibiotic resistance did exist. It is important for practitioners to follow local guidelines before ordering microbiological investigations on stool and prescribing empirical antibiotic treatment.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherMedcom Limited. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkcem.com/html/publications/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofHong Kong Journal of Emergency Medicineen_US
dc.subjectAnti-Bacterial Agentsen_US
dc.subjectDiarrheaen_US
dc.subjectDrug Resistanceen_US
dc.subjectFluoroquinolonesen_US
dc.titleWhat have we learnt from bacterial stool culture results? a retrospective study of hospitalised gastroenteritis cases in a regional hospital in Hong Kongen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHo, PL:plho@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHo, PL=rp00406en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-75749157768en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-75749157768&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume17en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage27en_US
dc.identifier.epage33en_US
dc.publisher.placeHong Kongen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, HT=35365481400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridQue, TL=7003786628en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, PL=7402211363en_US

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