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Article: Differential susceptibility of different cell lines to swine-origin influenza A H1N1, seasonal human influenza A H1N1, and avian influenza A H5N1 viruses
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TitleDifferential susceptibility of different cell lines to swine-origin influenza A H1N1, seasonal human influenza A H1N1, and avian influenza A H5N1 viruses
 
AuthorsLi, IWS1
Chan, KH1
To, KWK1
Wong, SSY1
Ho, PL1
Lau, SKP1
Woo, PCY1
Tsoi, HW1
Chan, JFW1
Cheng, VCC1
Zheng, BJ1
Chen, H1
Yuen, KY1
 
KeywordsCell tropism
H5N1
Influenza H1N1
Swine-origin
Viral load
 
Issue Date2009
 
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jcv
 
CitationJournal Of Clinical Virology, 2009, v. 46 n. 4, p. 325-330 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcv.2009.09.013
 
AbstractBackground: The novel swine-origin influenza A H1N1 virus (S-OIV) causes the current pandemic. Its tissue tropism and replication in different cell lines are not well understood. Objective: Compare the growth characteristics of cell lines infected by S-OIV, seasonal influenza A H1N1 (sH1N1) and avian influenza A H5N1 (H5N1) viruses and the effect of temperature on viral replication. Study design: Cytopathic effect (CPE), antigen expression by immunofluorescence (IF) and viral load profile by quantitative RT-PCR in 17 cell lines infected by S-OIV, sH1N1 and H5N1 were examined. Comparison of their replication efficiency in chick embryo was performed. The effect of temperature on viral replication in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells was determined by TCID 50 at 33 °C, 37 °C and 39 °C for 5 consecutive days. Results: S-OIV replicated in cell lines derived from different tissues or organs and host species with comparable viral load to sH1N1. Among 13 human cell lines tested, Caco-2 has the highest viral load for S-OIV. S-OIV showed a low viral load with no CPE or antigen expression in pig kidney cell PK-15, H5N1 demonstrated the most diverse cell tropism by CPE and antigen expression, and the highest viral replication efficiency in both cell lines and allantoic fluid. All three viruses demonstrated best growth at 37 °C in MDCK cells. Conclusion: Cell line growth characteristics of S-OIV, sH1N1 and H5N1 appear to correlate clinically and pathologically with involved anatomical sites and severity. Low replication of S-OIV in PK-15 suggests that this virus is more adapted to human than swine. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
 
ISSN1386-6532
2013 Impact Factor: 3.466
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.812
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcv.2009.09.013
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000272460900006
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Providence Foundation Limited
University Grant Council
Hong Kong SAR Government
Funding Information:

The authors would like to acknowledge Prof Albert DME Osterhaus from Department of Virology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands; the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the United States; Prof Fred Leung from Department of Zoology, Prof Pik-To Cheung from Department of Pediatrics, Prof MH Ng who is a past Head of Department of Microbiology, Queen Mary Hospital, The University of Hong Kong, HKSAR; Dr Wilina Lim from Virology Division of Public Health Laboratory Centre, Department of Health, HKSAR, and Dr David Ho from Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Centre, Rockefeller University, for their support in establishment of the cell lines. We would also like to acknowledge Miss Agnes Y. F. Fung and Mr Patrick Lam Y. P. for the technical support. The study is funded by the Providence Foundation Limited in memory of the late Dr Lui Hac Minh, the University Grant Council, and the Research Fund for the Control of Infectious Diseases (RFCID) of the Food and Health Bureau of the Hong Kong SAR Government.

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLi, IWS
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, KH
 
dc.contributor.authorTo, KWK
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, SSY
 
dc.contributor.authorHo, PL
 
dc.contributor.authorLau, SKP
 
dc.contributor.authorWoo, PCY
 
dc.contributor.authorTsoi, HW
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, JFW
 
dc.contributor.authorCheng, VCC
 
dc.contributor.authorZheng, BJ
 
dc.contributor.authorChen, H
 
dc.contributor.authorYuen, KY
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:51:20Z
 
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:51:20Z
 
dc.date.issued2009
 
dc.description.abstractBackground: The novel swine-origin influenza A H1N1 virus (S-OIV) causes the current pandemic. Its tissue tropism and replication in different cell lines are not well understood. Objective: Compare the growth characteristics of cell lines infected by S-OIV, seasonal influenza A H1N1 (sH1N1) and avian influenza A H5N1 (H5N1) viruses and the effect of temperature on viral replication. Study design: Cytopathic effect (CPE), antigen expression by immunofluorescence (IF) and viral load profile by quantitative RT-PCR in 17 cell lines infected by S-OIV, sH1N1 and H5N1 were examined. Comparison of their replication efficiency in chick embryo was performed. The effect of temperature on viral replication in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells was determined by TCID 50 at 33 °C, 37 °C and 39 °C for 5 consecutive days. Results: S-OIV replicated in cell lines derived from different tissues or organs and host species with comparable viral load to sH1N1. Among 13 human cell lines tested, Caco-2 has the highest viral load for S-OIV. S-OIV showed a low viral load with no CPE or antigen expression in pig kidney cell PK-15, H5N1 demonstrated the most diverse cell tropism by CPE and antigen expression, and the highest viral replication efficiency in both cell lines and allantoic fluid. All three viruses demonstrated best growth at 37 °C in MDCK cells. Conclusion: Cell line growth characteristics of S-OIV, sH1N1 and H5N1 appear to correlate clinically and pathologically with involved anatomical sites and severity. Low replication of S-OIV in PK-15 suggests that this virus is more adapted to human than swine. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Clinical Virology, 2009, v. 46 n. 4, p. 325-330 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcv.2009.09.013
 
dc.identifier.citeulike5914365
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcv.2009.09.013
 
dc.identifier.epage330
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000272460900006
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Providence Foundation Limited
University Grant Council
Hong Kong SAR Government
Funding Information:

The authors would like to acknowledge Prof Albert DME Osterhaus from Department of Virology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands; the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the United States; Prof Fred Leung from Department of Zoology, Prof Pik-To Cheung from Department of Pediatrics, Prof MH Ng who is a past Head of Department of Microbiology, Queen Mary Hospital, The University of Hong Kong, HKSAR; Dr Wilina Lim from Virology Division of Public Health Laboratory Centre, Department of Health, HKSAR, and Dr David Ho from Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Centre, Rockefeller University, for their support in establishment of the cell lines. We would also like to acknowledge Miss Agnes Y. F. Fung and Mr Patrick Lam Y. P. for the technical support. The study is funded by the Providence Foundation Limited in memory of the late Dr Lui Hac Minh, the University Grant Council, and the Research Fund for the Control of Infectious Diseases (RFCID) of the Food and Health Bureau of the Hong Kong SAR Government.

 
dc.identifier.issn1386-6532
2013 Impact Factor: 3.466
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.812
 
dc.identifier.issue4
 
dc.identifier.pmid19801200
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-71549137759
 
dc.identifier.spage325
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157568
 
dc.identifier.volume46
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jcv
 
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Virology
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAnimals
 
dc.subject.meshBirds - Virology
 
dc.subject.meshCell Line
 
dc.subject.meshCell Line, Tumor
 
dc.subject.meshChick Embryo
 
dc.subject.meshDogs
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshInfluenza A Virus, H1n1 Subtype - Physiology
 
dc.subject.meshInfluenza A Virus, H5n1 Subtype - Physiology
 
dc.subject.meshInfluenza In Birds - Virology
 
dc.subject.meshInfluenza, Human - Virology
 
dc.subject.meshSwine - Virology
 
dc.subject.meshSwine Diseases - Virology
 
dc.subject.meshTemperature
 
dc.subject.meshViral Load
 
dc.subject.meshVirus Replication
 
dc.subjectCell tropism
 
dc.subjectH5N1
 
dc.subjectInfluenza H1N1
 
dc.subjectSwine-origin
 
dc.subjectViral load
 
dc.titleDifferential susceptibility of different cell lines to swine-origin influenza A H1N1, seasonal human influenza A H1N1, and avian influenza A H5N1 viruses
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<description.abstract>Background: The novel swine-origin influenza A H1N1 virus (S-OIV) causes the current pandemic. Its tissue tropism and replication in different cell lines are not well understood. Objective: Compare the growth characteristics of cell lines infected by S-OIV, seasonal influenza A H1N1 (sH1N1) and avian influenza A H5N1 (H5N1) viruses and the effect of temperature on viral replication. Study design: Cytopathic effect (CPE), antigen expression by immunofluorescence (IF) and viral load profile by quantitative RT-PCR in 17 cell lines infected by S-OIV, sH1N1 and H5N1 were examined. Comparison of their replication efficiency in chick embryo was performed. The effect of temperature on viral replication in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells was determined by TCID 50 at 33 &#176;C, 37 &#176;C and 39 &#176;C for 5 consecutive days. Results: S-OIV replicated in cell lines derived from different tissues or organs and host species with comparable viral load to sH1N1. Among 13 human cell lines tested, Caco-2 has the highest viral load for S-OIV. S-OIV showed a low viral load with no CPE or antigen expression in pig kidney cell PK-15, H5N1 demonstrated the most diverse cell tropism by CPE and antigen expression, and the highest viral replication efficiency in both cell lines and allantoic fluid. All three viruses demonstrated best growth at 37 &#176;C in MDCK cells. Conclusion: Cell line growth characteristics of S-OIV, sH1N1 and H5N1 appear to correlate clinically and pathologically with involved anatomical sites and severity. Low replication of S-OIV in PK-15 suggests that this virus is more adapted to human than swine. &#169; 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.</description.abstract>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong