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Article: Studies of SARS virus vaccines
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TitleStudies of SARS virus vaccines
 
AuthorsZheng, BJ1
Du, LY1
Zhao, GY1
Lin, YP1
Sui, HY1
Chan, C1
Ma, S1
Guan, Y1
Yuen, KY1
 
Issue Date2008
 
PublisherHong Kong Medical Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkmj.org/resources/supp.html
 
CitationHong Kong Medical Journal, 2008, v. 14 suppl. 4, p. 39-43 [How to Cite?]
 
Abstract1. Intranasal vaccination using inactivated SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) vaccine with adjuvant can induce strong systemic (serum immunoglobulin [Ig] G) and respiratory tract local (tracheal-lung wash fluid IgA) antibody responses with neutralising activity. 2. RBD-Fc (protein-based vaccine) is able to induce effective neutralising antibodies able to provide protection from SARS-CoV infection in animal models. 3. A single dose of RBD-rAAV vaccination can induce adequate neutralising antibody against SARS-CoV infection. 4. Additional doses of vaccine increased the production of neutralising antibody 5-fold compared with a single dose. 5. RBD-rAAV vaccination provoked a prolonged antibody response with continually increasing levels of neutralising activity. 6. Intranasal vaccination with RBD-rAAV induced local IgA and systemic IgG neutralising antibodies and specific T-cell responses, able to protect against SARS-CoV infection in animal models. 7. When compared with the RBD-rAAV prime/boost vaccination, RBD-rAAV prime/RBD-peptide boost induced similar levels of Th1 and neutralising antibody responses that protected vaccinated mice from subsequent SARS-CoV challenges,but stronger Th2 and CTL responses. 8. Overall, our findings suggest that the inactivated vaccine, RBD-Fc and RBD-rAAV, can be further developed into effective and safe vaccines against SARS and that intranasal vaccination may be the preferred route of administration.
 
ISSN1024-2708
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.293
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorZheng, BJ
 
dc.contributor.authorDu, LY
 
dc.contributor.authorZhao, GY
 
dc.contributor.authorLin, YP
 
dc.contributor.authorSui, HY
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, C
 
dc.contributor.authorMa, S
 
dc.contributor.authorGuan, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorYuen, KY
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:51:18Z
 
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:51:18Z
 
dc.date.issued2008
 
dc.description.abstract1. Intranasal vaccination using inactivated SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) vaccine with adjuvant can induce strong systemic (serum immunoglobulin [Ig] G) and respiratory tract local (tracheal-lung wash fluid IgA) antibody responses with neutralising activity. 2. RBD-Fc (protein-based vaccine) is able to induce effective neutralising antibodies able to provide protection from SARS-CoV infection in animal models. 3. A single dose of RBD-rAAV vaccination can induce adequate neutralising antibody against SARS-CoV infection. 4. Additional doses of vaccine increased the production of neutralising antibody 5-fold compared with a single dose. 5. RBD-rAAV vaccination provoked a prolonged antibody response with continually increasing levels of neutralising activity. 6. Intranasal vaccination with RBD-rAAV induced local IgA and systemic IgG neutralising antibodies and specific T-cell responses, able to protect against SARS-CoV infection in animal models. 7. When compared with the RBD-rAAV prime/boost vaccination, RBD-rAAV prime/RBD-peptide boost induced similar levels of Th1 and neutralising antibody responses that protected vaccinated mice from subsequent SARS-CoV challenges,but stronger Th2 and CTL responses. 8. Overall, our findings suggest that the inactivated vaccine, RBD-Fc and RBD-rAAV, can be further developed into effective and safe vaccines against SARS and that intranasal vaccination may be the preferred route of administration.
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.identifier.citationHong Kong Medical Journal, 2008, v. 14 suppl. 4, p. 39-43 [How to Cite?]
 
dc.identifier.epage43
 
dc.identifier.hkuros156461
 
dc.identifier.issn1024-2708
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.293
 
dc.identifier.issuesuppl. 4
 
dc.identifier.pmid18708674
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-70449859520
 
dc.identifier.spage39
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157565
 
dc.identifier.volume14
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherHong Kong Medical Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkmj.org/resources/supp.html
 
dc.publisher.placeHong Kong
 
dc.relation.ispartofHong Kong Medical Journal
 
dc.rightsHong Kong Medical Journal. Copyright © Hong Kong Medical Association.
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.subject.meshAdministration, Intranasal
 
dc.subject.meshAnimals
 
dc.subject.meshCommunicable Disease Control
 
dc.subject.meshDisease Models, Animal
 
dc.subject.meshDisease Outbreaks - Prevention & Control
 
dc.subject.meshFemale
 
dc.subject.meshForecasting
 
dc.subject.meshHong Kong
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshInjections, Intramuscular
 
dc.subject.meshMale
 
dc.subject.meshMice
 
dc.subject.meshPredictive Value Of Tests
 
dc.subject.meshRisk Assessment
 
dc.subject.meshSars Virus - Immunology
 
dc.subject.meshSevere Acute Respiratory Syndrome - Epidemiology - Immunology - Prevention & Control
 
dc.subject.meshVaccination - Statistics & Numerical Data
 
dc.subject.meshVaccines, Inactivated - Administration & Dosage
 
dc.subject.meshViral Vaccines - Administration & Dosage - Immunology - Pharmacology
 
dc.titleStudies of SARS virus vaccines
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Du, LY</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Zhao, GY</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Lin, YP</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Sui, HY</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Chan, C</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Ma, S</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Guan, Y</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Yuen, KY</contributor.author>
<date.accessioned>2012-08-08T08:51:18Z</date.accessioned>
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<description.abstract>1. Intranasal vaccination using inactivated SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) vaccine with adjuvant can induce strong systemic (serum immunoglobulin [Ig] G) and respiratory tract local (tracheal-lung wash fluid IgA) antibody responses with neutralising activity. 2. RBD-Fc (protein-based vaccine) is able to induce effective neutralising antibodies able to provide protection from SARS-CoV infection in animal models. 3. A single dose of RBD-rAAV vaccination can induce adequate neutralising antibody against SARS-CoV infection. 4. Additional doses of vaccine increased the production of neutralising antibody 5-fold compared with a single dose. 5. RBD-rAAV vaccination provoked a prolonged antibody response with continually increasing levels of neutralising activity. 6. Intranasal vaccination with RBD-rAAV induced local IgA and systemic IgG neutralising antibodies and specific T-cell responses, able to protect against SARS-CoV infection in animal models. 7. When compared with the RBD-rAAV prime/boost vaccination, RBD-rAAV prime/RBD-peptide boost induced similar levels of Th1 and neutralising antibody responses that protected vaccinated mice from subsequent SARS-CoV challenges,but stronger Th2 and CTL responses. 8. Overall, our findings suggest that the inactivated vaccine, RBD-Fc and RBD-rAAV, can be further developed into effective and safe vaccines against SARS and that intranasal vaccination may be the preferred route of administration.</description.abstract>
<language>eng</language>
<publisher>Hong Kong Medical Association. The Journal&apos;s web site is located at http://www.hkmj.org/resources/supp.html</publisher>
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<subject.mesh>Administration, Intranasal</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Animals</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Communicable Disease Control</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Disease Models, Animal</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Disease Outbreaks - Prevention &amp; Control</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Female</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Forecasting</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Hong Kong</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Humans</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Injections, Intramuscular</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Male</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Mice</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Predictive Value Of Tests</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Risk Assessment</subject.mesh>
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<subject.mesh>Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome - Epidemiology - Immunology - Prevention &amp; Control</subject.mesh>
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<subject.mesh>Vaccines, Inactivated - Administration &amp; Dosage</subject.mesh>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong