File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Distribution of integron-associated trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resistance determinants among Escherichia coli from humans and food-producing animals

TitleDistribution of integron-associated trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resistance determinants among Escherichia coli from humans and food-producing animals
Authors
Issue Date2009
Citation
Letters In Applied Microbiology, 2009, v. 49 n. 5, p. 627-634 How to Cite?
AbstractAims: To compare the distribution of integrons and trimethoprim- sulfamethoxazole resistance genes among Escherichia coli isolates from humans and food-producing animals. Methods and Results: A collection of 174 multidrug-resistant E. coli isolates obtained from faecal samples of food-producing animals (n = 64) and humans (n = 59), and patients with urinary tract infections (n = 51) in Hong Kong during 2002-2004 were studied. The strains were analysed for their phylogenetic groups, the presence of sul genes (sul1 and sul2), integrons (intl1 and intl2) and class 1 integron-associated dfr cassette genes by PCR, restriction enzyme analysis and sequencing. Integrons were identified in 110 (63·2%) isolates. The prevalence of integrons was significantly different according to the specimen sources (animal faecal 84·4%, human faecal 67·8% and human urinary 31·4%) and phylogenetic groups (B1 80·8%, A 77·6%, D 54·1% and B2 11·5%). Faecal isolates (both human and animal) are more likely to belong to group A and B1. In contrast, most urinary isolates were either groups B2 and D. Among dfr containing isolates, dfrA1 and dfrA12 were almost exclusively found in strains of phylogenetic groups A and B1; and were present in animal and human faecal isolates. In contrast, dfrA17 was found in both faecal and urinary isolates and comprised strains from all phylogenetic groups. The sul1 and sul2 genes were equally prevalent among the isolates irrespective of the specimen source and phylogenetic group status. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis of isolates with identical cassette genes showed that they were genetically diverse. Conclusions: More animal faecal isolates carry class 1 integrons than human faecal and human urinary isolates, and the distribution of phylogenetic groups is common across animal and human faecal isolates but different from human urinary isolates. Significance and Impact of the Study: Commensal isolates from food-producing animals are an important reservoir for integrons carrying antibiotic resistance genes.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157558
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.579
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.641
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHo, PLen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, RCen_US
dc.contributor.authorChow, KHen_US
dc.contributor.authorQue, TLen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:51:14Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:51:14Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.citationLetters In Applied Microbiology, 2009, v. 49 n. 5, p. 627-634en_US
dc.identifier.issn0266-8254en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157558-
dc.description.abstractAims: To compare the distribution of integrons and trimethoprim- sulfamethoxazole resistance genes among Escherichia coli isolates from humans and food-producing animals. Methods and Results: A collection of 174 multidrug-resistant E. coli isolates obtained from faecal samples of food-producing animals (n = 64) and humans (n = 59), and patients with urinary tract infections (n = 51) in Hong Kong during 2002-2004 were studied. The strains were analysed for their phylogenetic groups, the presence of sul genes (sul1 and sul2), integrons (intl1 and intl2) and class 1 integron-associated dfr cassette genes by PCR, restriction enzyme analysis and sequencing. Integrons were identified in 110 (63·2%) isolates. The prevalence of integrons was significantly different according to the specimen sources (animal faecal 84·4%, human faecal 67·8% and human urinary 31·4%) and phylogenetic groups (B1 80·8%, A 77·6%, D 54·1% and B2 11·5%). Faecal isolates (both human and animal) are more likely to belong to group A and B1. In contrast, most urinary isolates were either groups B2 and D. Among dfr containing isolates, dfrA1 and dfrA12 were almost exclusively found in strains of phylogenetic groups A and B1; and were present in animal and human faecal isolates. In contrast, dfrA17 was found in both faecal and urinary isolates and comprised strains from all phylogenetic groups. The sul1 and sul2 genes were equally prevalent among the isolates irrespective of the specimen source and phylogenetic group status. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis of isolates with identical cassette genes showed that they were genetically diverse. Conclusions: More animal faecal isolates carry class 1 integrons than human faecal and human urinary isolates, and the distribution of phylogenetic groups is common across animal and human faecal isolates but different from human urinary isolates. Significance and Impact of the Study: Commensal isolates from food-producing animals are an important reservoir for integrons carrying antibiotic resistance genes.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofLetters in Applied Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshAnti-Bacterial Agents - Pharmacologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCattleen_US
dc.subject.meshDrug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterialen_US
dc.subject.meshEscherichia Coli - Classification - Drug Effects - Genetics - Isolation & Purificationen_US
dc.subject.meshEscherichia Coli Infections - Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshEscherichia Coli Proteins - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshFeces - Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshIntegronsen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshPhylogenyen_US
dc.subject.meshPoultryen_US
dc.subject.meshSulfamethoxazole - Pharmacologyen_US
dc.subject.meshSwineen_US
dc.subject.meshTrimethoprim - Pharmacologyen_US
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten_US
dc.titleDistribution of integron-associated trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resistance determinants among Escherichia coli from humans and food-producing animalsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHo, PL:plho@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChow, KH:khchowb@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHo, PL=rp00406en_US
dc.identifier.authorityChow, KH=rp00370en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1472-765X.2009.02717.xen_US
dc.identifier.pmid19780962-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-70350025153en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-70350025153&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume49en_US
dc.identifier.issue5en_US
dc.identifier.spage627en_US
dc.identifier.epage634en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000270730000016-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, PL=7402211363en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, RC=8612000100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChow, KH=7202180736en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridQue, TL=7003786628en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike5958271-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats