File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Analysis of H5N1 avian influenza infections from wild bird surveillance in Hong Kong from January 2006 to October 2007

TitleAnalysis of H5N1 avian influenza infections from wild bird surveillance in Hong Kong from January 2006 to October 2007
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherTaylor & Francis Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/03079457.asp
Citation
Avian Pathology, 2009, v. 38 n. 2, p. 107-119 How to Cite?
AbstractIntensive surveillance of dead wild birds for H5N1 avian influenza infection is conducted in Hong Kong. Between January 2006 and October 2007 pooled cloacal and tracheal swabs from 17692 dead wild birds (from 16 different orders including 82 genera) were tested and 33 H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses were isolated. No H5N1 infection has occurred in poultry farms since January 2003, or in live poultry markets in Hong Kong since November 2003 until a recent detection of H5N1 virus by surveillance of live poultry markets in June 2008. The gross and histopathology in the various H5N1-infected avian species is described, along with the performance of the virus isolation and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests used. This evaluation also included determination of virus titres and detection limits for the H5 haemagglutinin gene (H5)and matrix gene real-time reverse-transcription PCR tests in cloacal and tracheal swabs from 12 wild birds. The viruses isolated belonged to Clades 2.3.2 and 2.3.4, and within Clade 2.3.4 some clustering was evident based on H5 haemagglutinin gene haemagglutinating sequencing. There were no differences in the pathology findings between these subgroupings and the various diagnostic tests gave similar results for these viruses, except for a loss in sensitivity of the H5 real-time reverse-transcription PCR for several viruses in one cluster from birds submitted in February 2007. The use of multiple test methods was important in maintaining the diagnostic sensitivity for detecting avian influenza viruses with high genetic variability. © 2009 Houghton Trust Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157546
ISSN
2014 Impact Factor: 1.639
2014 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.953
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Avian Virology, Histology and Molecular Biology laboratories at Tai Lung Veterinary Laboratory
Centre for Emerging Infectious Diseases at the Department of Microbiology, The University of Hong Kong
Dr Thomas Sit, Assistant Director Inspection and Quarantine, AFCD
Research Grants CouncilHKU 7512/06M
Hong Kong SAR Government
Area Excellence Scheme of the University Grants CommitteeAoE/M-12/6
National Institutes of Health (National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases [NIAID])HHSN266200700005C
NIAIDHHSN266200700005C
Funding Information:

The authors acknowledge the excellent technical support provided by the staff of the Avian Virology, Histology and Molecular Biology laboratories at Tai Lung Veterinary Laboratory and the staff of the Centre for Emerging Infectious Diseases at the Department of Microbiology, The University of Hong Kong. They thank all staff from the Agriculture Fisheries and Conservation Department and the Leisure and Cultural Services Department of the Hong Kong SAR Government for collection and submission of dead bird carcasses, and particularly thank Mr W. H. Lee, Ornithologist from the Conservation Branch, AFCD for assistance with identification of wild bird species. The authors thank Dr David Suarez and Dr Erica Spackman of South East Poultry Research Laboratory, USDA, Athens, Georgia, USA and Dr Hans Heine of the Australian Animal Health Laboratory, CSIRO, Geelong, Australia for the RRT-PCR primer and probe sequences; Dr Peter Hooper of AAHL-CSIRO for the influenza A nucleoprotein monoclonal antibody and Dr Nancy Cox of Centres for Disease Control, Atlanta, Georgia, USA for the H5-HA-specific monoclonal antibodies. The support of Dr Thomas Sit, Assistant Director Inspection and Quarantine, AFCD for this work is gratefully acknowledged. This study was in part supported by the Research Grants Council (HKU 7512/06M) of the Hong Kong SAR Government, the Area Excellence Scheme of the University Grants Committee (grant AoE/M-12/6) and the National Institutes of Health (National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases [NIAID] contract HHSN266200700005C). G.J.D.S. is supported by a career development award under NIAID contract HHSN266200700005C. The views expressed in this paper are those of the authors only, and may not represent the opinion of the Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department.

References
Grants

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorEllis, TMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDyrting, KCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, CWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChadwick, Ben_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChiang, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, Pen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSmith, GJDen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGuan, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMalik Peiris, JSen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:51:08Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:51:08Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAvian Pathology, 2009, v. 38 n. 2, p. 107-119en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0307-9457en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157546-
dc.description.abstractIntensive surveillance of dead wild birds for H5N1 avian influenza infection is conducted in Hong Kong. Between January 2006 and October 2007 pooled cloacal and tracheal swabs from 17692 dead wild birds (from 16 different orders including 82 genera) were tested and 33 H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses were isolated. No H5N1 infection has occurred in poultry farms since January 2003, or in live poultry markets in Hong Kong since November 2003 until a recent detection of H5N1 virus by surveillance of live poultry markets in June 2008. The gross and histopathology in the various H5N1-infected avian species is described, along with the performance of the virus isolation and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests used. This evaluation also included determination of virus titres and detection limits for the H5 haemagglutinin gene (H5)and matrix gene real-time reverse-transcription PCR tests in cloacal and tracheal swabs from 12 wild birds. The viruses isolated belonged to Clades 2.3.2 and 2.3.4, and within Clade 2.3.4 some clustering was evident based on H5 haemagglutinin gene haemagglutinating sequencing. There were no differences in the pathology findings between these subgroupings and the various diagnostic tests gave similar results for these viruses, except for a loss in sensitivity of the H5 real-time reverse-transcription PCR for several viruses in one cluster from birds submitted in February 2007. The use of multiple test methods was important in maintaining the diagnostic sensitivity for detecting avian influenza viruses with high genetic variability. © 2009 Houghton Trust Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/03079457.aspen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAvian Pathologyen_HK
dc.titleAnalysis of H5N1 avian influenza infections from wild bird surveillance in Hong Kong from January 2006 to October 2007en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailSmith, GJD: gjsmith@hkucc1.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailGuan, Y: yguan@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailMalik Peiris, JS: malik@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySmith, GJD=rp00444en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityGuan, Y=rp00397en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMalik Peiris, JS=rp00410en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/03079450902751855en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-65649094077en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-65649094077&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume38en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage107en_HK
dc.identifier.epage119en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000264529100003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.relation.projectThe role of migratory birds in the transmission of H5N1 Influenza virus in eastern Asia-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridEllis, TM=7202589926en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDyrting, KC=6508235969en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, CW=16067451100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChadwick, B=26536993200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, C=22933358100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChiang, M=26537163900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, C=34969290200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, P=34969388200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSmith, GJD=8344015800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGuan, Y=7202924055en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMalik Peiris, JS=7005486823en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike4233618-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats