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Article: Identification of the progenitors of Indonesian and Vietnamese avian influenza A (H5N1) viruses from southern China

TitleIdentification of the progenitors of Indonesian and Vietnamese avian influenza A (H5N1) viruses from southern China
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherAmerican Society for Microbiology. The Journal's web site is located at http://jvi.asm.org/
Citation
Journal of Virology, 2008, v. 82 n. 7, p. 3405-3414 How to Cite?
AbstractThe transmission of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus to Southeast Asian countries triggered the first major outbreak and transmission wave in late 2003, accelerating the pandemic threat to the world. Due to the lack of influenza surveillance prior to these outbreaks, the genetic diversity and the transmission pathways of H5N1 viruses from this period remain undefined. To determine the possible source of the wave 1 H5N1 viruses, we recently conducted further sequencing and analysis of samples collected in live-poultry markets from Guangdong, Hunan, and Yunnan in southern China from 2001 to 2004. Phylogenetic analysis of the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes of 73 H5N1 isolates from this period revealed a greater genetic diversity in southern China than previously reported. Moreover, results show that eight viruses isolated from Yunnan in 2002 and 2003 were most closely related to the clade 1 virus sublineage from Vietnam, Thailand, and Malaysia, while two viruses from Hunan in 2002 and 2003 were most closely related to viruses from Indonesia (clade 2.1). Further phylogenetic analyses of the six internal genes showed that all 10 of those viruses maintained similar phylogenetic relationships as the surface genes. The 10 progenitor viruses were genotype Z and shared high similarity (≥99%) with their corresponding descendant viruses in most gene segments. These results suggest a direct transmission link for H5N1 viruses between Yunnan and Vietnam and also between Hunan and Indonesia during 2002 and 2003. Poultry trade may be responsible for virus introduction to Vietnam, while the transmission route from Hunan to Indonesia remains unclear. Copyright © 2008, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157513
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.606
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.347
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWang, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDhanasekaran, Ven_HK
dc.contributor.authorDuan, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorBahl, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWebster, RGen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, JSMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChen, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSmith, GJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGuan, Yen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:50:45Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:50:45Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Virology, 2008, v. 82 n. 7, p. 3405-3414en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0022-538Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157513-
dc.description.abstractThe transmission of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus to Southeast Asian countries triggered the first major outbreak and transmission wave in late 2003, accelerating the pandemic threat to the world. Due to the lack of influenza surveillance prior to these outbreaks, the genetic diversity and the transmission pathways of H5N1 viruses from this period remain undefined. To determine the possible source of the wave 1 H5N1 viruses, we recently conducted further sequencing and analysis of samples collected in live-poultry markets from Guangdong, Hunan, and Yunnan in southern China from 2001 to 2004. Phylogenetic analysis of the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes of 73 H5N1 isolates from this period revealed a greater genetic diversity in southern China than previously reported. Moreover, results show that eight viruses isolated from Yunnan in 2002 and 2003 were most closely related to the clade 1 virus sublineage from Vietnam, Thailand, and Malaysia, while two viruses from Hunan in 2002 and 2003 were most closely related to viruses from Indonesia (clade 2.1). Further phylogenetic analyses of the six internal genes showed that all 10 of those viruses maintained similar phylogenetic relationships as the surface genes. The 10 progenitor viruses were genotype Z and shared high similarity (≥99%) with their corresponding descendant viruses in most gene segments. These results suggest a direct transmission link for H5N1 viruses between Yunnan and Vietnam and also between Hunan and Indonesia during 2002 and 2003. Poultry trade may be responsible for virus introduction to Vietnam, while the transmission route from Hunan to Indonesia remains unclear. Copyright © 2008, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Society for Microbiology. The Journal's web site is located at http://jvi.asm.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Virologyen_HK
dc.rightsJournal of Virology. Copyright © American Society for Microbiology.-
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshChina - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHemagglutinin Glycoproteins, Influenza Virus - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshInfluenza A Virus, H5n1 Subtype - Classification - Genetics - Isolation & Purificationen_US
dc.subject.meshInfluenza In Birds - Epidemiology - Virologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMolecular Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMolecular Sequence Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshNeuraminidase - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshPhylogenyen_US
dc.subject.meshPoultryen_US
dc.subject.meshPoultry Diseases - Epidemiology - Virologyen_US
dc.subject.meshRna, Viral - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshSequence Analysis, Dnaen_US
dc.subject.meshSequence Homology, Amino Aciden_US
dc.subject.meshViral Proteins - Geneticsen_US
dc.titleIdentification of the progenitors of Indonesian and Vietnamese avian influenza A (H5N1) viruses from southern Chinaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailDuan, L: dlhku@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailZhang, J: zhangajx@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWebster, RG: stjude@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailPeiris, JSM: malik@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChen, H: hlchen@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailSmith, GJ: gjsmith@HKUCC.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailGuan, Y: yguan@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityZhang, JX=rp00413en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPeiris, JSM=rp00410en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChen, H=rp00383en_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySmith, GJD=rp00444en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityGuan, Y=rp00397en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1128/JVI.02468-07en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18216109-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2268469-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-41149176903en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros143993-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-41149176903&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume82en_HK
dc.identifier.issue7en_HK
dc.identifier.spage3405en_HK
dc.identifier.epage3414en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000254139800020-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, J=36078145500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVijaykrishna, D=12752817700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDuan, L=7201932765en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBahl, J=35308668200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, JX=12752135600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWebster, RG=36048363100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPeiris, JSM=7005486823en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, H=26643315400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSmith, GJD=8344015800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGuan, Y=7202924055en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike4313853-
dc.customcontrol.immutablesml 130528-

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