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Article: Comparison of T-Spot.TB and tuberculin skin test among silicotic patients
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TitleComparison of T-Spot.TB and tuberculin skin test among silicotic patients
 
AuthorsLeung, CC1 3
Yam, WC2
Yew, WW4
Ho, PL2
Tam, CM3
Law, WS3
Wong, MY3
Leung, M3
Tsui, D3
 
KeywordsLatent tuberculosis infection
Silicosis
Smoking
 
Issue Date2008
 
PublisherEuropean Respiratory Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://erj.ersjournals.com
 
CitationEuropean Respiratory Journal, 2008, v. 31 n. 2, p. 266-272 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1183/09031936.00054707
 
AbstractIn the present study, T-Spot.TB and the tuberculin skin test (TST) were compared in the screening of latent tuberculosis infection among silicotic patients. A conditional probability model was used to compare the potential clinical utilities of T-Spot.TB and TST performed on 134 silicotic subjects from December 1, 2004 to January 31, 2007. Data from a historical cohort were also reanalysed for further comparison. Agreement with T-Spot.TB was best using a TST cut-off of 10 mm. Age ≥65 yrs independently predicted a tuberculin reaction <10 mm (odds ratio=3), but not a negative T-Spot.TB response. Lower measures of agreement were observed among current smokers and those aged ≥65 yrs. Tuberculin reaction size was well correlated with both early secretary antigenic target 6 and culture filtrate protein 10 spot counts, except among current smokers. Within the current estimates of sensitivity (88-95%) and specificity (86-99%) for T-Spot.TB, the positive likelihood ratio for T-Spot.TB test would be substantially higher (6.29-95.0 versus 1.65-1.94) and negative likelihood ratio substantially lower (0.05-0.14 versus 0.32-0.41) than the corresponding ratios for the tuberculin test. A low tuberculosis risk differential was similarly observed between tuberculin-negative and untreated tuberculin-positive subjects in the historical cohort. T-Spot.TB is likely to perform better than tuberculin test in the screening of latent tuberculosis infection among silicotic subjects. Copyright©ERS Journals Ltd 2008.
 
ISSN0903-1936
2013 Impact Factor: 7.125
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1183/09031936.00054707
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000253038400009
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLeung, CC
 
dc.contributor.authorYam, WC
 
dc.contributor.authorYew, WW
 
dc.contributor.authorHo, PL
 
dc.contributor.authorTam, CM
 
dc.contributor.authorLaw, WS
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, MY
 
dc.contributor.authorLeung, M
 
dc.contributor.authorTsui, D
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:50:41Z
 
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:50:41Z
 
dc.date.issued2008
 
dc.description.abstractIn the present study, T-Spot.TB and the tuberculin skin test (TST) were compared in the screening of latent tuberculosis infection among silicotic patients. A conditional probability model was used to compare the potential clinical utilities of T-Spot.TB and TST performed on 134 silicotic subjects from December 1, 2004 to January 31, 2007. Data from a historical cohort were also reanalysed for further comparison. Agreement with T-Spot.TB was best using a TST cut-off of 10 mm. Age ≥65 yrs independently predicted a tuberculin reaction <10 mm (odds ratio=3), but not a negative T-Spot.TB response. Lower measures of agreement were observed among current smokers and those aged ≥65 yrs. Tuberculin reaction size was well correlated with both early secretary antigenic target 6 and culture filtrate protein 10 spot counts, except among current smokers. Within the current estimates of sensitivity (88-95%) and specificity (86-99%) for T-Spot.TB, the positive likelihood ratio for T-Spot.TB test would be substantially higher (6.29-95.0 versus 1.65-1.94) and negative likelihood ratio substantially lower (0.05-0.14 versus 0.32-0.41) than the corresponding ratios for the tuberculin test. A low tuberculosis risk differential was similarly observed between tuberculin-negative and untreated tuberculin-positive subjects in the historical cohort. T-Spot.TB is likely to perform better than tuberculin test in the screening of latent tuberculosis infection among silicotic subjects. Copyright©ERS Journals Ltd 2008.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Respiratory Journal, 2008, v. 31 n. 2, p. 266-272 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1183/09031936.00054707
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1183/09031936.00054707
 
dc.identifier.epage272
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000253038400009
 
dc.identifier.issn0903-1936
2013 Impact Factor: 7.125
 
dc.identifier.issue2
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-40649086465
 
dc.identifier.spage266
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157509
 
dc.identifier.volume31
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherEuropean Respiratory Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://erj.ersjournals.com
 
dc.publisher.placeSwitzerland
 
dc.relation.ispartofEuropean Respiratory Journal
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subjectLatent tuberculosis infection
 
dc.subjectSilicosis
 
dc.subjectSmoking
 
dc.titleComparison of T-Spot.TB and tuberculin skin test among silicotic patients
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Tam, CM</contributor.author>
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<contributor.author>Wong, MY</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Leung, M</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Tsui, D</contributor.author>
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Author Affiliations
  1. Pneumoconiosis Clinic
  2. The University of Hong Kong
  3. Centre for Health Protection
  4. Grantham Hospital Hong Kong