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Article: Rhinovirus infection in hospitalized children in hong kong: A prospective study

TitleRhinovirus infection in hospitalized children in hong kong: A prospective study
Authors
KeywordsAsthma exacerbation
Children
Disease burden
Lower respiratory tract infection
Rhinovirus
Issue Date2007
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pidj.com
Citation
Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, 2007, v. 26 n. 11, p. 995-1000 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVES: To analyze the clinical features and estimate the hospitalization disease burden of rhinovirus infection in children in Hong Kong. METHODS: In this prospective study, nasopharyngeal aspirates were taken from children aged <18 years with symptoms of acute respiratory infection admitted to Queen Mary Hospital on one fixed day of the week during August 2001-July 2002 for detection of common respiratory viruses by immunofluorescence, viral culture, and for rhinovirus, human metapneumovirus, and coronaviruses by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The clinical features of rhinovirus infections were analyzed and hospitalization disease burden was estimated. RESULTS: Altogether 239 of the 426 nasopharyngeal aspirates (56.1%) were positive for respiratory viruses, including 151 patients with rhinovirus (35.4%). The median age was 2.34 years. Upper respiratory infection, asthma exacerbation, pneumonia, and acute bronchiolitis were diagnosed in 44.4%, 19.9%, 11.3%, and 7.9%, respectively. The most common symptoms were cough (81.5%), runny nose (76.8%), and fever (68.9%). Shortness of breath, wheezes, and crepitation were present in 25.8%, 29.1%, and 18.5%, respectively. Fifty-five of 99 patients (55.6%) had chest radiographic abnormalities, most commonly perihilar streakiness. Children with chronic diseases were more likely to have lower respiratory tract infection and these children required longer hospitalization (mean 0.6 days longer). Coinfection with other respiratory pathogens was common (33.1%). CONCLUSION: Rhinovirus is frequently associated with asthmatic exacerbations and lower respiratory tract infection, especially in children with chronic diseases and is potentially an important contributor to hospitalization in children in Hong Kong. © 2007 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157499
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.587
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.416
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheuk, DKLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTang, IWHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, KHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWoo, PCYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, MJSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChiu, SSen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:50:36Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:50:36Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPediatric Infectious Disease Journal, 2007, v. 26 n. 11, p. 995-1000en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0891-3668en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157499-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: To analyze the clinical features and estimate the hospitalization disease burden of rhinovirus infection in children in Hong Kong. METHODS: In this prospective study, nasopharyngeal aspirates were taken from children aged <18 years with symptoms of acute respiratory infection admitted to Queen Mary Hospital on one fixed day of the week during August 2001-July 2002 for detection of common respiratory viruses by immunofluorescence, viral culture, and for rhinovirus, human metapneumovirus, and coronaviruses by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The clinical features of rhinovirus infections were analyzed and hospitalization disease burden was estimated. RESULTS: Altogether 239 of the 426 nasopharyngeal aspirates (56.1%) were positive for respiratory viruses, including 151 patients with rhinovirus (35.4%). The median age was 2.34 years. Upper respiratory infection, asthma exacerbation, pneumonia, and acute bronchiolitis were diagnosed in 44.4%, 19.9%, 11.3%, and 7.9%, respectively. The most common symptoms were cough (81.5%), runny nose (76.8%), and fever (68.9%). Shortness of breath, wheezes, and crepitation were present in 25.8%, 29.1%, and 18.5%, respectively. Fifty-five of 99 patients (55.6%) had chest radiographic abnormalities, most commonly perihilar streakiness. Children with chronic diseases were more likely to have lower respiratory tract infection and these children required longer hospitalization (mean 0.6 days longer). Coinfection with other respiratory pathogens was common (33.1%). CONCLUSION: Rhinovirus is frequently associated with asthmatic exacerbations and lower respiratory tract infection, especially in children with chronic diseases and is potentially an important contributor to hospitalization in children in Hong Kong. © 2007 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pidj.comen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPediatric Infectious Disease Journalen_HK
dc.rightsThe Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal. Copyright © Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.-
dc.subjectAsthma exacerbationen_HK
dc.subjectChildrenen_HK
dc.subjectDisease burdenen_HK
dc.subjectLower respiratory tract infectionen_HK
dc.subjectRhinovirusen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAsthma - Complicationsen_US
dc.subject.meshChilden_US
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHospitalizationen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshInfanten_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshNasopharynx - Virologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPicornaviridae Infections - Diagnosis - Epidemiology - Physiopathology - Virologyen_US
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshRespiratory Tract Infections - Diagnosis - Epidemiology - Physiopathology - Virologyen_US
dc.subject.meshRhinovirus - Classification - Genetics - Isolation & Purificationen_US
dc.titleRhinovirus infection in hospitalized children in hong kong: A prospective studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWoo, PCY: pcywoo@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailPeiris, MJS: malik@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChiu, SS: ssschiu@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWoo, PCY=rp00430en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPeiris, MJS=rp00410en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChiu, SS=rp00421en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/INF.0b013e3181586b63en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid17984805-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-37349034534en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros133411-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-37349034534&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume26en_HK
dc.identifier.issue11en_HK
dc.identifier.spage995en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1000en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000250818300004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheuk, DKL=8705936100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTang, IWH=23096139500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, KH=7406034307en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWoo, PCY=7201801340en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPeiris, MJS=7005486823en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChiu, SS=7202291500en_HK

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