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Article: Clinical features and complete genome characterization of a distinct human rhinovirus (HRV) genetic cluster, probably representing a previously undetected HRV species, HRV-C, associated with acute respiratory illness in children

TitleClinical features and complete genome characterization of a distinct human rhinovirus (HRV) genetic cluster, probably representing a previously undetected HRV species, HRV-C, associated with acute respiratory illness in children
Authors
Issue Date2007
Citation
Journal Of Clinical Microbiology, 2007, v. 45 n. 11, p. 3655-3664 How to Cite?
AbstractAlthough human rhinoviruses (HRVs) are common causes of respiratory illness, their molecular epidemiology has been poorly investigated. Despite the recent findings of new HRV genotypes, their clinical disease spectrum and phylogenetic positions were not fully understood. In this study, 203 prospectively collected nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPAs), negative for common respiratory viruses (83 were human bocavirus [HBoV] positive and 120 HBoV negative), from hospitalized children during a 1-year period were subjected to reverse transcription-PCR for HRV. HRV was detected in 14 NPAs positive and 12 NPAs negative for HBoV. Upon VP4 gene analysis, 5 of these 26 HRV strains were found to belong to HRV-A while 21 belonged to a genetic clade probably representing a previously undetected HRV species, HRV-C, that is phylogenetically distinct from the two known HRV species, HRV-A and HRV-B. The VP4 sequences of these HRV-C strains were closely related to the newly identified HRV strains from the United States and Australia. Febrile wheeze or asthma was the most common presentation (76%) of HRV-C infection, which peaked in fall and winter. Complete genome sequencing of three HRV-C strains revealed that HRV-C represents an additional HRV species, with features distinct from HRV-A and HRV-B. Analysis of VP1 of HRV-C revealed major deletions in regions important for neutralization in other HRVs, which may be signs of a distinct species, while within-clade amino acid variation in potentially antigenic regions may indicate the existence of different serotypes among HRV-C strains. A newly identified HRV species, HRV-C, is circulating worldwide and is an important cause of febrile wheeze and asthmatic exacerbations in children requiring hospitalization. Copyright © 2007, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157495
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.631
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.151
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLau, SKPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYip, CCYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTsoi, HWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, RAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSo, LYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLau, YLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, KHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWoo, PCYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYuen, KYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:50:33Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:50:33Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Clinical Microbiology, 2007, v. 45 n. 11, p. 3655-3664en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0095-1137en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157495-
dc.description.abstractAlthough human rhinoviruses (HRVs) are common causes of respiratory illness, their molecular epidemiology has been poorly investigated. Despite the recent findings of new HRV genotypes, their clinical disease spectrum and phylogenetic positions were not fully understood. In this study, 203 prospectively collected nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPAs), negative for common respiratory viruses (83 were human bocavirus [HBoV] positive and 120 HBoV negative), from hospitalized children during a 1-year period were subjected to reverse transcription-PCR for HRV. HRV was detected in 14 NPAs positive and 12 NPAs negative for HBoV. Upon VP4 gene analysis, 5 of these 26 HRV strains were found to belong to HRV-A while 21 belonged to a genetic clade probably representing a previously undetected HRV species, HRV-C, that is phylogenetically distinct from the two known HRV species, HRV-A and HRV-B. The VP4 sequences of these HRV-C strains were closely related to the newly identified HRV strains from the United States and Australia. Febrile wheeze or asthma was the most common presentation (76%) of HRV-C infection, which peaked in fall and winter. Complete genome sequencing of three HRV-C strains revealed that HRV-C represents an additional HRV species, with features distinct from HRV-A and HRV-B. Analysis of VP1 of HRV-C revealed major deletions in regions important for neutralization in other HRVs, which may be signs of a distinct species, while within-clade amino acid variation in potentially antigenic regions may indicate the existence of different serotypes among HRV-C strains. A newly identified HRV species, HRV-C, is circulating worldwide and is an important cause of febrile wheeze and asthmatic exacerbations in children requiring hospitalization. Copyright © 2007, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Microbiologyen_HK
dc.rightsJournal of Clinical Microbiology. Copyright © American Society for Microbiology.-
dc.subject.meshAcute Diseaseen_US
dc.subject.meshAmino Acid Sequenceen_US
dc.subject.meshChilden_US
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshGenome, Viralen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshInfanten_US
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newbornen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMolecular Sequence Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshMultigene Familyen_US
dc.subject.meshPhylogenyen_US
dc.subject.meshRespiratory Tract Infections - Virologyen_US
dc.subject.meshRhinovirus - Classification - Geneticsen_US
dc.titleClinical features and complete genome characterization of a distinct human rhinovirus (HRV) genetic cluster, probably representing a previously undetected HRV species, HRV-C, associated with acute respiratory illness in childrenen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLau, SKP: skplau@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailYip, CCY: yipcyril@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailTsoi, HW: hwtsoi@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLau, YL: lauylung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWoo, PCY: pcywoo@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailYuen, KY: kyyuen@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLau, SKP=rp00486en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYip, CCY=rp01721en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTsoi, HW=rp00439en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLau, YL=rp00361en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWoo, PCY=rp00430en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYuen, KY=rp00366en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1128/JCM.01254-07en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid17804649-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-36348997665en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros139776-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-36348997665&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume45en_HK
dc.identifier.issue11en_HK
dc.identifier.spage3655en_HK
dc.identifier.epage3664en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000250932700027-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, SKP=7401596211en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYip, CCY=14016999800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTsoi, HW=6603822102en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, RA=7408203830en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSo, LY=36784797000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, YL=7201403380en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, KH=7406034307en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWoo, PCY=7201801340en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYuen, KY=36078079100en_HK

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