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Article: Escherichia coli producing CTX-M β-lactamases in food animals in Hong Kong
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TitleEscherichia coli producing CTX-M β-lactamases in food animals in Hong Kong
 
AuthorsDuan, RS1
Sit, THC2
Wong, SSY1
Wong, RCW1
Chow, KH1
Mak, GC1
Ng, LT2
Yam, WC1
Yuen, KY1
Ho, PL1
 
Issue Date2006
 
PublisherMary Ann Liebert, Inc Publishers. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.liebertpub.com/mdr
 
CitationMicrobial Drug Resistance, 2006, v. 12 n. 2, p. 145-148 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/mdr.2006.12.145
 
AbstractA study was conducted to evaluate the occurrence of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs)-producing Escherichia coli from fecal samples of healthy food animals in Hong Kong. Rectal or cloacal swabs were obtained from cattle, pigs, chicken, ducks, geese, and pigeons in slaughterhouses or wholesale markets over a 5-month period in 2002. Antibiotic-containing medium was used for selective isolation of potentially ESBL-producing E. coli. Of 734 samples analyzed, six (2%) from pigs, three (3.1%) from cattle, and one (3%) from pigeons had E. coli strains with the ESBL phenotype. The ESBL content for the 10 isolates include CTX-M-3 (n = 4), CTX-M-13 (n = 3), CTX-M-14 (n = 2), and CTX-M-24 (n = 1). In five isolates, the blaCTX-M gene was encoded on transferable plasmids (60 or 90 kb), and the gene was found to transfer to E. coli (J53 or JP995) with frequencies of 10-7 to 10-3 per donor cells. The ten isolates had five distinct pulsotypes with some clonal spread. However, the isolates from the different kinds of animals were not clonaly related. These findings imply that bacteria of animal origins may serve as reservoirs of some ESBL genes. © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
 
ISSN1076-6294
2013 Impact Factor: 2.524
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1089/mdr.2006.12.145
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000239288500012
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorDuan, RS
 
dc.contributor.authorSit, THC
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, SSY
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, RCW
 
dc.contributor.authorChow, KH
 
dc.contributor.authorMak, GC
 
dc.contributor.authorNg, LT
 
dc.contributor.authorYam, WC
 
dc.contributor.authorYuen, KY
 
dc.contributor.authorHo, PL
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:50:04Z
 
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:50:04Z
 
dc.date.issued2006
 
dc.description.abstractA study was conducted to evaluate the occurrence of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs)-producing Escherichia coli from fecal samples of healthy food animals in Hong Kong. Rectal or cloacal swabs were obtained from cattle, pigs, chicken, ducks, geese, and pigeons in slaughterhouses or wholesale markets over a 5-month period in 2002. Antibiotic-containing medium was used for selective isolation of potentially ESBL-producing E. coli. Of 734 samples analyzed, six (2%) from pigs, three (3.1%) from cattle, and one (3%) from pigeons had E. coli strains with the ESBL phenotype. The ESBL content for the 10 isolates include CTX-M-3 (n = 4), CTX-M-13 (n = 3), CTX-M-14 (n = 2), and CTX-M-24 (n = 1). In five isolates, the blaCTX-M gene was encoded on transferable plasmids (60 or 90 kb), and the gene was found to transfer to E. coli (J53 or JP995) with frequencies of 10-7 to 10-3 per donor cells. The ten isolates had five distinct pulsotypes with some clonal spread. However, the isolates from the different kinds of animals were not clonaly related. These findings imply that bacteria of animal origins may serve as reservoirs of some ESBL genes. © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationMicrobial Drug Resistance, 2006, v. 12 n. 2, p. 145-148 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/mdr.2006.12.145
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1089/mdr.2006.12.145
 
dc.identifier.epage148
 
dc.identifier.hkuros118603
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000239288500012
 
dc.identifier.issn1076-6294
2013 Impact Factor: 2.524
 
dc.identifier.issue2
 
dc.identifier.pmid16922633
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33746712211
 
dc.identifier.spage145
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157450
 
dc.identifier.volume12
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherMary Ann Liebert, Inc Publishers. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.liebertpub.com/mdr
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofMicrobial Drug Resistance
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAnimals
 
dc.subject.meshAnimals, Domestic - Microbiology
 
dc.subject.meshAnti-Bacterial Agents - Pharmacology
 
dc.subject.meshCattle
 
dc.subject.meshDrug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial - Genetics
 
dc.subject.meshEscherichia Coli - Drug Effects - Genetics - Metabolism
 
dc.subject.meshFood Microbiology
 
dc.subject.meshGenes, Bacterial
 
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - Epidemiology
 
dc.subject.meshPoultry
 
dc.subject.meshSwine
 
dc.subject.meshBeta-Lactamases - Biosynthesis - Genetics
 
dc.titleEscherichia coli producing CTX-M β-lactamases in food animals in Hong Kong
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Hong Kong Government