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Article: Genetic characterization of diverse HIV-1 strains in an immigrant population living in New York City

TitleGenetic characterization of diverse HIV-1 strains in an immigrant population living in New York City
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.jaids.com
Citation
Journal Of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, 2006, v. 41 n. 4, p. 399-404 How to Cite?
AbstractNew York City (NYC) is one of the original foci of the HIV-1 epidemic and has a greater number of AIDS cases than any other city in the United States. NYC also hosts the highest number of immigrants among the nation's cities: more than 2 million among a total population of 8 million. Such a high rate of immigration could act as a potential source for introducing and disseminating novel HIV-1 strains into the United States. Our current study focuses on the genetic characterization of HIV-1 strains circulating in an immigrant population in NYC. Of the 505 HIV-1-positive specimens obtained, 196 were available for viral sequencing from the C2 to V3 region of env. Phylogenetic analysis using maximum-likelihood and neighbor-joining methods demonstrated that non-B subtypes and circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) accounted for 43.4% (85 of 196 cases), whereas the remaining 56.6% (111 of 196) cases had viral variants similar to the typical North American subtype B virus. Of those non-B subtypes and CRFs, subtype A and CRF02 dominated (63.5% combined); other subtypes, including C, D, F1, G, CRF01_AE, and CRF06_cpx, were also detected. Two HIV-1 sequences do not cluster with any known subtypes or CRFs. Furthermore, the distribution of non-B subtypes and CRFs was consistent with the countries of origin, suggesting that many of the study subjects were likely infected in their home country before they entered the United States. Subtype B viruses identified in the immigrant population showed no significant differences from the typical North American B subtype, however, indicating that a significant proportion of the immigrants must have been infected after they came to the United States. Public health officials and physicians should be aware of the growing genetic diversity of HIV-1 in this country, particularly in areas with sizable immigrant populations. Copyright © 2006 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157445
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.806
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.434
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLin, HHen_US
dc.contributor.authorGaschen, BKen_US
dc.contributor.authorCollie, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorElFishaway, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, Zen_US
dc.contributor.authorKorber, BTen_US
dc.contributor.authorBeatrice, STen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Len_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:50:02Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:50:02Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, 2006, v. 41 n. 4, p. 399-404en_US
dc.identifier.issn1525-4135en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157445-
dc.description.abstractNew York City (NYC) is one of the original foci of the HIV-1 epidemic and has a greater number of AIDS cases than any other city in the United States. NYC also hosts the highest number of immigrants among the nation's cities: more than 2 million among a total population of 8 million. Such a high rate of immigration could act as a potential source for introducing and disseminating novel HIV-1 strains into the United States. Our current study focuses on the genetic characterization of HIV-1 strains circulating in an immigrant population in NYC. Of the 505 HIV-1-positive specimens obtained, 196 were available for viral sequencing from the C2 to V3 region of env. Phylogenetic analysis using maximum-likelihood and neighbor-joining methods demonstrated that non-B subtypes and circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) accounted for 43.4% (85 of 196 cases), whereas the remaining 56.6% (111 of 196) cases had viral variants similar to the typical North American subtype B virus. Of those non-B subtypes and CRFs, subtype A and CRF02 dominated (63.5% combined); other subtypes, including C, D, F1, G, CRF01_AE, and CRF06_cpx, were also detected. Two HIV-1 sequences do not cluster with any known subtypes or CRFs. Furthermore, the distribution of non-B subtypes and CRFs was consistent with the countries of origin, suggesting that many of the study subjects were likely infected in their home country before they entered the United States. Subtype B viruses identified in the immigrant population showed no significant differences from the typical North American B subtype, however, indicating that a significant proportion of the immigrants must have been infected after they came to the United States. Public health officials and physicians should be aware of the growing genetic diversity of HIV-1 in this country, particularly in areas with sizable immigrant populations. Copyright © 2006 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.jaids.comen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromesen_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshChilden_US
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_US
dc.subject.meshEmigration And Immigrationen_US
dc.subject.meshGenetic Variationen_US
dc.subject.meshGenome, Viralen_US
dc.subject.meshGenotypeen_US
dc.subject.meshHiv Envelope Protein Gp160 - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshHiv Infections - Virologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHiv-1 - Classification - Genetics - Isolation & Purificationen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshNew York Cityen_US
dc.subject.meshPhylogenyen_US
dc.subject.meshPolymerase Chain Reactionen_US
dc.subject.meshRecombination, Geneticen_US
dc.subject.meshSequence Analysis, Dnaen_US
dc.subject.meshSequence Homologyen_US
dc.titleGenetic characterization of diverse HIV-1 strains in an immigrant population living in New York Cityen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChen, Z:zchenai@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChen, Z=rp00243en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/01.qai.0000200663.47838.f1en_US
dc.identifier.pmid16652046-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33646782951en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33646782951&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume41en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage399en_US
dc.identifier.epage404en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000236741200001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLin, HH=7405572052en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGaschen, BK=7801345611en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCollie, M=24358633000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridElFishaway, M=13608832200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, Z=35271180800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKorber, BT=19335057200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBeatrice, ST=13608459900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, L=8783285300en_US

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