File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Diagnostic application of genotypic identification of mycobacteria

TitleDiagnostic application of genotypic identification of mycobacteria
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherSociety for General Microbiology. The Journal's web site is located at http://jmm.sgmjournals.org
Citation
Journal Of Medical Microbiology, 2006, v. 55 n. 5, p. 529-536 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study evaluated conventional methods, GLC and three molecular tests, including 16S rRNA sequencing, for the identification of mycobacteria, and the experiences of the authors with the integration of these methods into a diagnostic clinical laboratory were also recorded. Of 1067 clinical isolates of mycobacteria identified by conventional tests, 365 were tested by Accuprobe hybridization assays and PCRs specific for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) complex or Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), 202 were tested by 16S rRNA sequencing, and 142 were tested by GLC. Three runs of all tests were performed on a weekly basis. The identifications for 209 MTB complex and 118 MAC isolates obtained by species-specific PCR were in complete agreement with AccuProbe hybridization and conventional test results. The 16S rRNA sequence-based identification, at a similarity of ≥99%, for 132 of 142 isolates was concordant with the identifications made by the biochemical methods, and for 134 isolates was concordant with the identifications made by GLC at species, group or complex level. 16S rRNA sequencing resulted in fewer incorrectly identified or unidentified organisms than GLC or conventional tests. For the slowly growing non-tuberculous mycobacteria, the mean turnaround times for identification were 4-5 days for 16S rRNA sequencing, 14-29 days for GLC and 22-23 days for conventional methods. Considering the large proportion of some species among clinical isolates, a strategy of initial screening with species-specific PCR (or AccuProbe assays) for the MTB complex and MAC, followed by direct sequencing of the strains that yield negative results, should make 16S rRNA sequencing more affordable for routine application in diagnostic laboratories. © 2006 SGM.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157443
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.269
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.060
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYam, WCen_US
dc.contributor.authorYuen, KYen_US
dc.contributor.authorKam, SYen_US
dc.contributor.authorYiu, LSen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, KSen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, CCen_US
dc.contributor.authorTam, CMen_US
dc.contributor.authorHo, POen_US
dc.contributor.authorYew, WWen_US
dc.contributor.authorSeto, WHen_US
dc.contributor.authorHo, PLen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:50:01Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:50:01Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Medical Microbiology, 2006, v. 55 n. 5, p. 529-536en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-2615en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157443-
dc.description.abstractThis study evaluated conventional methods, GLC and three molecular tests, including 16S rRNA sequencing, for the identification of mycobacteria, and the experiences of the authors with the integration of these methods into a diagnostic clinical laboratory were also recorded. Of 1067 clinical isolates of mycobacteria identified by conventional tests, 365 were tested by Accuprobe hybridization assays and PCRs specific for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) complex or Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), 202 were tested by 16S rRNA sequencing, and 142 were tested by GLC. Three runs of all tests were performed on a weekly basis. The identifications for 209 MTB complex and 118 MAC isolates obtained by species-specific PCR were in complete agreement with AccuProbe hybridization and conventional test results. The 16S rRNA sequence-based identification, at a similarity of ≥99%, for 132 of 142 isolates was concordant with the identifications made by the biochemical methods, and for 134 isolates was concordant with the identifications made by GLC at species, group or complex level. 16S rRNA sequencing resulted in fewer incorrectly identified or unidentified organisms than GLC or conventional tests. For the slowly growing non-tuberculous mycobacteria, the mean turnaround times for identification were 4-5 days for 16S rRNA sequencing, 14-29 days for GLC and 22-23 days for conventional methods. Considering the large proportion of some species among clinical isolates, a strategy of initial screening with species-specific PCR (or AccuProbe assays) for the MTB complex and MAC, followed by direct sequencing of the strains that yield negative results, should make 16S rRNA sequencing more affordable for routine application in diagnostic laboratories. © 2006 SGM.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSociety for General Microbiology. The Journal's web site is located at http://jmm.sgmjournals.orgen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Medical Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAlgorithmsen_US
dc.subject.meshDna, Bacterial - Chemistry - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshFatty Acids - Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshGas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometryen_US
dc.subject.meshGenes, Rrnaen_US
dc.subject.meshGenotypeen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMolecular Diagnostic Techniques - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshMycobacterium Avium Complex - Chemistry - Classification - Genetics - Isolation & Purificationen_US
dc.subject.meshMycobacterium Avium-Intracellulare Infection - Diagnosisen_US
dc.subject.meshMycobacterium Tuberculosis - Chemistry - Classification - Genetics - Isolation & Purificationen_US
dc.subject.meshNucleic Acid Hybridizationen_US
dc.subject.meshPolymerase Chain Reactionen_US
dc.subject.meshRna, Ribosomal, 16S - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshSequence Analysis, Dnaen_US
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshTuberculosis - Diagnosisen_US
dc.titleDiagnostic application of genotypic identification of mycobacteriaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailYam, WC:wcyam@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailYuen, KY:kyyuen@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailHo, PL:plho@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityYam, WC=rp00313en_US
dc.identifier.authorityYuen, KY=rp00366en_US
dc.identifier.authorityHo, PL=rp00406en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1099/jmm.0.46298-0en_US
dc.identifier.pmid16585639-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33646250433en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros118625-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33646250433&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume55en_US
dc.identifier.issue5en_US
dc.identifier.spage529en_US
dc.identifier.epage536en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000237150200009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYam, WC=7004281720en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYuen, KY=36078079100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKam, SY=36893223500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYiu, LS=13204244000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, KS=7406031627en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, CC=7402612644en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTam, CM=7201442997en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, PO=13205089300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYew, WW=7005934631en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSeto, WH=7005799377en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, PL=7402211363en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats