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Article: Clinical isolates of Streptococcus iniae from Asia are more mucoid and β-hemolytic than those from North America
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TitleClinical isolates of Streptococcus iniae from Asia are more mucoid and β-hemolytic than those from North America
 
AuthorsLau, SKP2
Woo, PCY2
Luk, WK1
Fung, AMY2
Hui, WT2
Fong, AHC2
Chow, CW2
Wong, SSY2
Yuen, KY2
 
Issue Date2006
 
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/diagmicrobio
 
CitationDiagnostic Microbiology And Infectious Disease, 2006, v. 54 n. 3, p. 177-181 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.diagmicrobio.2005.09.012
 
AbstractStreptococcus iniae, a widely distributed fish pathogen, is known to cause rare cases of human infection. We describe 2 cases of invasive S. iniae infection, one with septic arthritis complicating chronic gout and the other with bacteremic cellulitis. Both patients were Chinese and have been regularly handling fresh fish for cooking. Both isolates were unidentified or misidentified by 3 commercially available identification system and were only identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. When compared with a clinical isolate of S. iniae from Canada, their colonies were larger, more β-hemolytic, and mucoid. Although bacteremic cellulitis has been described as the most common infection associated with S. iniae, the bacterium has not been reported to cause exacerbations of gouty arthritis previously. Clinical laboratories should be aware of the possibility of different colony morphology of S. iniae from Asia. More accurate identification of nongroupable β-hemolytic streptococci, especially from patients with epidemiologic linkage to fresh fish, may uncover more cases of S. iniae infection. The Asian population and handlers of fresh fish should be informed of the risk of acquiring S. iniae infection. © 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
 
ISSN0732-8893
2013 Impact Factor: 2.568
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.275
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.diagmicrobio.2005.09.012
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000236224200004
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLau, SKP
 
dc.contributor.authorWoo, PCY
 
dc.contributor.authorLuk, WK
 
dc.contributor.authorFung, AMY
 
dc.contributor.authorHui, WT
 
dc.contributor.authorFong, AHC
 
dc.contributor.authorChow, CW
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, SSY
 
dc.contributor.authorYuen, KY
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:49:59Z
 
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:49:59Z
 
dc.date.issued2006
 
dc.description.abstractStreptococcus iniae, a widely distributed fish pathogen, is known to cause rare cases of human infection. We describe 2 cases of invasive S. iniae infection, one with septic arthritis complicating chronic gout and the other with bacteremic cellulitis. Both patients were Chinese and have been regularly handling fresh fish for cooking. Both isolates were unidentified or misidentified by 3 commercially available identification system and were only identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. When compared with a clinical isolate of S. iniae from Canada, their colonies were larger, more β-hemolytic, and mucoid. Although bacteremic cellulitis has been described as the most common infection associated with S. iniae, the bacterium has not been reported to cause exacerbations of gouty arthritis previously. Clinical laboratories should be aware of the possibility of different colony morphology of S. iniae from Asia. More accurate identification of nongroupable β-hemolytic streptococci, especially from patients with epidemiologic linkage to fresh fish, may uncover more cases of S. iniae infection. The Asian population and handlers of fresh fish should be informed of the risk of acquiring S. iniae infection. © 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationDiagnostic Microbiology And Infectious Disease, 2006, v. 54 n. 3, p. 177-181 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.diagmicrobio.2005.09.012
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.diagmicrobio.2005.09.012
 
dc.identifier.epage181
 
dc.identifier.hkuros118592
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000236224200004
 
dc.identifier.issn0732-8893
2013 Impact Factor: 2.568
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.275
 
dc.identifier.issue3
 
dc.identifier.pmid16427243
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33644615114
 
dc.identifier.spage177
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157439
 
dc.identifier.volume54
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/diagmicrobio
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofDiagnostic Microbiology and Infectious Disease
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsDiagnostic Microbiology and Infectious Disease. Copyright © Elsevier Inc.
 
dc.subject.meshAged
 
dc.subject.meshAnimals
 
dc.subject.meshArthritis, Infectious - Microbiology
 
dc.subject.meshAsia
 
dc.subject.meshBacteremia - Complications - Microbiology
 
dc.subject.meshBacterial Typing Techniques
 
dc.subject.meshCellulitis - Microbiology
 
dc.subject.meshDna, Bacterial
 
dc.subject.meshDna, Ribosomal
 
dc.subject.meshFishes - Microbiology
 
dc.subject.meshGout - Microbiology
 
dc.subject.meshHemolysis
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshMale
 
dc.subject.meshNorth America
 
dc.subject.meshPolysaccharides, Bacterial - Biosynthesis
 
dc.subject.meshRna, Ribosomal, 16S - Genetics
 
dc.subject.meshStreptococcal Infections - Microbiology
 
dc.subject.meshStreptococcus - Classification - Isolation & Purification - Pathogenicity - Physiology
 
dc.titleClinical isolates of Streptococcus iniae from Asia are more mucoid and β-hemolytic than those from North America
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. Tseung Kwan O Hospital
  2. The University of Hong Kong