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Article: Association of Laribacter hongkongensis in community-acquired gastroenteritis with travel and eating fish: A multicentre case-control study
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TitleAssociation of Laribacter hongkongensis in community-acquired gastroenteritis with travel and eating fish: A multicentre case-control study
 
AuthorsWoo, PCY2
Lau, SKP2
Teng, JLL2
Que, TL3
Yung, RWH4
Luk, WK1
Lai, RWM5
Hui, WT2
Wong, SSY2
Yau, HH3
Yuen, KY2
 
Issue Date2004
 
PublisherThe Lancet Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/lancet
 
CitationLancet, 2004, v. 363 n. 9425, p. 1941-1947 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(04)16407-6
 
AbstractBackground Laribacter hongkongensis has been recovered from several patients with gastroenteritis. However, the causative role of this organism in human gastroenteritis is still unproven, and sources of the bacterium are unknown. We undertook a multicentre case-control study to investigate the association of L hongkongensis with gastroenteritis. Methods Faecal samples from patients with community-acquired gastroenteritis and controls were cultured for L hongkongensis. Targeted food surveillance was done to identify potential sources of this bacterium. All isolates of this organism from patients and food items were characterised by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and ribotyping. Findings During a 4-month period, L hongkongensis was recovered from 17 of 3788 patients with community-acquired gastroenteritis, but was absent in 1894 controls (p=0·001). Those who were culture-positive for this bacterium had a recent history of travel (ten [59%] patients vs two [6%] of 34 matched controls, p<0·0001), of fish consumption (16 [94%] vs 19 [56%], p=0·009), and of eating minced freshwater fish meat (five [29%] vs one [3%], p=0·012). We recovered 25 L hongkongensis isolates from intestinal samples of freshwater fish and two from minced freshwater fish meat. Bacteria with the same pulsed-field gel electrophoretic pattern and ribotype were recovered from one patient and a sample of minced freshwater fish meat, which was from the same retail market recently visited by the patient. We did not see this particular combination of electrophoretic pattern and ribotype in any other isolates. Interpretation L hongkongensis is associated with community-acquired gastroenteritis and traveller's diarrhoea. However, its causative role has not been shown. Freshwater fish is one source of this bacterium.
 
ISSN0140-6736
2013 Impact Factor: 39.207
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(04)16407-6
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000221962800008
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorWoo, PCY
 
dc.contributor.authorLau, SKP
 
dc.contributor.authorTeng, JLL
 
dc.contributor.authorQue, TL
 
dc.contributor.authorYung, RWH
 
dc.contributor.authorLuk, WK
 
dc.contributor.authorLai, RWM
 
dc.contributor.authorHui, WT
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, SSY
 
dc.contributor.authorYau, HH
 
dc.contributor.authorYuen, KY
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:49:53Z
 
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:49:53Z
 
dc.date.issued2004
 
dc.description.abstractBackground Laribacter hongkongensis has been recovered from several patients with gastroenteritis. However, the causative role of this organism in human gastroenteritis is still unproven, and sources of the bacterium are unknown. We undertook a multicentre case-control study to investigate the association of L hongkongensis with gastroenteritis. Methods Faecal samples from patients with community-acquired gastroenteritis and controls were cultured for L hongkongensis. Targeted food surveillance was done to identify potential sources of this bacterium. All isolates of this organism from patients and food items were characterised by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and ribotyping. Findings During a 4-month period, L hongkongensis was recovered from 17 of 3788 patients with community-acquired gastroenteritis, but was absent in 1894 controls (p=0·001). Those who were culture-positive for this bacterium had a recent history of travel (ten [59%] patients vs two [6%] of 34 matched controls, p<0·0001), of fish consumption (16 [94%] vs 19 [56%], p=0·009), and of eating minced freshwater fish meat (five [29%] vs one [3%], p=0·012). We recovered 25 L hongkongensis isolates from intestinal samples of freshwater fish and two from minced freshwater fish meat. Bacteria with the same pulsed-field gel electrophoretic pattern and ribotype were recovered from one patient and a sample of minced freshwater fish meat, which was from the same retail market recently visited by the patient. We did not see this particular combination of electrophoretic pattern and ribotype in any other isolates. Interpretation L hongkongensis is associated with community-acquired gastroenteritis and traveller's diarrhoea. However, its causative role has not been shown. Freshwater fish is one source of this bacterium.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationLancet, 2004, v. 363 n. 9425, p. 1941-1947 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(04)16407-6
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(04)16407-6
 
dc.identifier.epage1947
 
dc.identifier.hkuros94831
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000221962800008
 
dc.identifier.issn0140-6736
2013 Impact Factor: 39.207
 
dc.identifier.issue9425
 
dc.identifier.pmid15194253
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-2942601556
 
dc.identifier.spage1941
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157430
 
dc.identifier.volume363
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherThe Lancet Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/lancet
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofLancet
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAdult
 
dc.subject.meshAged
 
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 And Over
 
dc.subject.meshAnimals
 
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studies
 
dc.subject.meshCommunity-Acquired Infections - Microbiology
 
dc.subject.meshDiarrhea - Microbiology
 
dc.subject.meshElectrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
 
dc.subject.meshFeces - Microbiology
 
dc.subject.meshFemale
 
dc.subject.meshFishes - Microbiology
 
dc.subject.meshFood Microbiology
 
dc.subject.meshGastroenteritis - Microbiology
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshInfant
 
dc.subject.meshMale
 
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
 
dc.subject.meshNeisseriaceae - Classification - Genetics - Isolation & Purification
 
dc.subject.meshNeisseriaceae Infections - Microbiology - Transmission
 
dc.subject.meshRna, Bacterial - Genetics
 
dc.subject.meshRisk Factors
 
dc.subject.meshSequence Analysis, Rna
 
dc.subject.meshTravel
 
dc.titleAssociation of Laribacter hongkongensis in community-acquired gastroenteritis with travel and eating fish: A multicentre case-control study
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<description.abstract>Background Laribacter hongkongensis has been recovered from several patients with gastroenteritis. However, the causative role of this organism in human gastroenteritis is still unproven, and sources of the bacterium are unknown. We undertook a multicentre case-control study to investigate the association of L hongkongensis with gastroenteritis. Methods Faecal samples from patients with community-acquired gastroenteritis and controls were cultured for L hongkongensis. Targeted food surveillance was done to identify potential sources of this bacterium. All isolates of this organism from patients and food items were characterised by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and ribotyping. Findings During a 4-month period, L hongkongensis was recovered from 17 of 3788 patients with community-acquired gastroenteritis, but was absent in 1894 controls (p=0&#183;001). Those who were culture-positive for this bacterium had a recent history of travel (ten [59%] patients vs two [6%] of 34 matched controls, p&lt;0&#183;0001), of fish consumption (16 [94%] vs 19 [56%], p=0&#183;009), and of eating minced freshwater fish meat (five [29%] vs one [3%], p=0&#183;012). We recovered 25 L hongkongensis isolates from intestinal samples of freshwater fish and two from minced freshwater fish meat. Bacteria with the same pulsed-field gel electrophoretic pattern and ribotype were recovered from one patient and a sample of minced freshwater fish meat, which was from the same retail market recently visited by the patient. We did not see this particular combination of electrophoretic pattern and ribotype in any other isolates. Interpretation L hongkongensis is associated with community-acquired gastroenteritis and traveller&apos;s diarrhoea. However, its causative role has not been shown. Freshwater fish is one source of this bacterium.</description.abstract>
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Author Affiliations
  1. Tseung Kwan O Hospital
  2. The University of Hong Kong
  3. Tuen Mun Hospital
  4. Pamela Youde Nethersole Eastern Hospital
  5. United Christian Hospital Hong Kong