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Article: siRNA, miRNA and HIV: Promises and challenges

TitlesiRNA, miRNA and HIV: Promises and challenges
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/cr/marketing/index.html
Citation
Cell Research, 2005, v. 15 n. 11-12, p. 935-946 How to Cite?
AbstractSmall interfering RNA (siRNA) and microRNA (miRNA) are small RNAs of 18-25 nucleotides (nt) in length that play important roles in regulating gene expression. They are incorporated into an RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) and serve as guides for silencing their corresponding target mRNAs based on complementary base-pairing. The promise of gene silencing has led many researchers to consider siRNA as an anti-viral tool. However, in long-term settings, many viruses appear to escape from this therapeutical strategy. An example of this may be seen in the case of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) which is able to evade RNA silencing by either mutating the siRNA-targeted sequence or by encoding for a partial suppressor of RNAi (RNA interference). On the other hand, because miRNA targeting does not require absolute complementarity of base-pairing, mutational escape by viruses from miRNA-specified silencing may be more difficult to achieve. In this review, we discuss stratagems used by various viruses to avoid the cells' antiviral si/mi-RNA defenses and notions of how viruses might control and regulate host cell genes by encoding viral miRNAs (vmiRNAs).
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157429
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 14.812
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.805
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYeung, MLen_US
dc.contributor.authorBennasser, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorLe, SYen_US
dc.contributor.authorJeang, KTen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:49:53Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:49:53Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.citationCell Research, 2005, v. 15 n. 11-12, p. 935-946en_US
dc.identifier.issn1001-0602en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157429-
dc.description.abstractSmall interfering RNA (siRNA) and microRNA (miRNA) are small RNAs of 18-25 nucleotides (nt) in length that play important roles in regulating gene expression. They are incorporated into an RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) and serve as guides for silencing their corresponding target mRNAs based on complementary base-pairing. The promise of gene silencing has led many researchers to consider siRNA as an anti-viral tool. However, in long-term settings, many viruses appear to escape from this therapeutical strategy. An example of this may be seen in the case of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) which is able to evade RNA silencing by either mutating the siRNA-targeted sequence or by encoding for a partial suppressor of RNAi (RNA interference). On the other hand, because miRNA targeting does not require absolute complementarity of base-pairing, mutational escape by viruses from miRNA-specified silencing may be more difficult to achieve. In this review, we discuss stratagems used by various viruses to avoid the cells' antiviral si/mi-RNA defenses and notions of how viruses might control and regulate host cell genes by encoding viral miRNAs (vmiRNAs).en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/cr/marketing/index.htmlen_US
dc.relation.ispartofCell Researchen_US
dc.subject.meshHiv - Genetics - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHiv Infections - Genetics - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMicrornas - Isolation & Purification - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshRna, Small Interfering - Isolation & Purification - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshRna, Viral - Isolation & Purification - Physiologyen_US
dc.titlesiRNA, miRNA and HIV: Promises and challengesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailYeung, ML:pmlyeung@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityYeung, ML=rp01402en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/sj.cr.7290371en_US
dc.identifier.pmid16354572-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-29244448022en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-29244448022&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume15en_US
dc.identifier.issue11-12en_US
dc.identifier.spage935en_US
dc.identifier.epage946en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000234281600021-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYeung, ML=8350940900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBennasser, Y=8335747500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLe, SY=7006184376en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJeang, KT=7004824803en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike588376-

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