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Article: The combined use of hydroxyapatite and bioresorbable plates to repair cranial defects in children

TitleThe combined use of hydroxyapatite and bioresorbable plates to repair cranial defects in children
Authors
KeywordsBone Integration
Cerebrospinal Fluid Pulsation
Cranioplasty
Hydroxyapatite
Pediatric Neurosurgery
Resorbable Plates
Issue Date2005
PublisherAmerican Association of Neurological Surgeons. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.thejns-net.org
Citation
Journal Of Neurosurgery, 2005, v. 102 PEDIATRICS SUPPL. 1, p. 36-43 How to Cite?
AbstractObject. Hydroxyapatite cement (HAC) is used with increasing frequency by craniofacial surgeons for building facial and skull base structures and by neurosurgeons for cranioplasty. Failures of HAC in cranioplasty have been attributed to breakage due to subjacent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pulsations through the dura mater. The authors describe a technique that involves inserting a resorbable MacroPore perforated plate to dampen CSF pulsations and then pouring HAC over the plate to fill a cranial defect and complete skull contouring. Methods. Fifteen children ranging in age from 2 to 9.5 years were included in the study; the size of the skull defects in these patients ranged from 6.25 to 42.5 cm2, with a mean of 20.65 cm2. Patients in whom the combined MacroPore-HAC devices were implanted underwent follow-up examinations that included serial skull radiography and computerized tomography scans. No fractures of the implants were demonstrated. At 6 months postsurgery, small fingerlings of new bone growth appeared in the underside of the HAC plate, probably spanning from the dura through perforations in the MacroPore plate. At intervals ranging from 18 months to 20 years after implantation, the gaps between cranial bone edges and that the HAC began to blur, culminating in the complete bonding of host bone with the margin of the HAC plate. All implants remained radiopaque and maintained size, thickness, and shape. Conclusions. The findings of this study are promising and indicate that the combined use of HAC and a bioresorbable undercarriage that is osteoconductive, such as the MacroPore perforated plate, may produce a versatile and lasting cranioplasty in children.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157420
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.443
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.673
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPang, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorTse, HHen_US
dc.contributor.authorZwienenbergLee, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorZovickian, Jen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:49:48Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:49:48Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Neurosurgery, 2005, v. 102 PEDIATRICS SUPPL. 1, p. 36-43en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-3085en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157420-
dc.description.abstractObject. Hydroxyapatite cement (HAC) is used with increasing frequency by craniofacial surgeons for building facial and skull base structures and by neurosurgeons for cranioplasty. Failures of HAC in cranioplasty have been attributed to breakage due to subjacent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pulsations through the dura mater. The authors describe a technique that involves inserting a resorbable MacroPore perforated plate to dampen CSF pulsations and then pouring HAC over the plate to fill a cranial defect and complete skull contouring. Methods. Fifteen children ranging in age from 2 to 9.5 years were included in the study; the size of the skull defects in these patients ranged from 6.25 to 42.5 cm2, with a mean of 20.65 cm2. Patients in whom the combined MacroPore-HAC devices were implanted underwent follow-up examinations that included serial skull radiography and computerized tomography scans. No fractures of the implants were demonstrated. At 6 months postsurgery, small fingerlings of new bone growth appeared in the underside of the HAC plate, probably spanning from the dura through perforations in the MacroPore plate. At intervals ranging from 18 months to 20 years after implantation, the gaps between cranial bone edges and that the HAC began to blur, culminating in the complete bonding of host bone with the margin of the HAC plate. All implants remained radiopaque and maintained size, thickness, and shape. Conclusions. The findings of this study are promising and indicate that the combined use of HAC and a bioresorbable undercarriage that is osteoconductive, such as the MacroPore perforated plate, may produce a versatile and lasting cranioplasty in children.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Association of Neurological Surgeons. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.thejns-net.orgen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Neurosurgeryen_US
dc.subjectBone Integrationen_US
dc.subjectCerebrospinal Fluid Pulsationen_US
dc.subjectCranioplastyen_US
dc.subjectHydroxyapatiteen_US
dc.subjectPediatric Neurosurgeryen_US
dc.subjectResorbable Platesen_US
dc.titleThe combined use of hydroxyapatite and bioresorbable plates to repair cranial defects in childrenen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailTse, HH:herman@graduate.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityTse, HH=rp00519en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-26944485558en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-26944485558&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume102 PEDIATRICSen_US
dc.identifier.issueSUPPL. 1en_US
dc.identifier.spage36en_US
dc.identifier.epage43en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPang, D=7101945272en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTse, HH=7006070596en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZwienenbergLee, M=6506735647en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSmith, M=8872720600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZovickian, J=6508174173en_US

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