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Article: Current status and future directions for Laribacter hongkongensis, a novel bacterium associated with gastroenteritis and traveller's diarrhoea

TitleCurrent status and future directions for Laribacter hongkongensis, a novel bacterium associated with gastroenteritis and traveller's diarrhoea
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.co-infectiousdiseases.com
Citation
Current Opinion in Infectious Diseases, 2005, v. 18 n. 5, p. 413-419 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose of review: Despite extensive investigations, a microbiological cause cannot be found in about half of the patients with infectious disease. Throughout the years, scientists have spent tremendous efforts in looking for microorganisms associated with these 'unexplained infectious disease syndromes'. Recently, a novel bacterium, Laribacter hongkongensis, was discovered and shown to be associated with gastroenteritis and traveller's diarrhoea. This review summarizes the current status, and shares with the readers the authors' experience in the microbiology, classification, epidemiology, clinical disease, laboratory diagnosis, antibiotic resistance and treatment of L. hongkongensis. It also discusses the importance and perspective of describing novel pathogenic bacterial species. Recent findings: L. hongkongensis was shown to be associated with gastroenteritis and traveller's diarrhoea. Consumption of fish was associated with recovery of L. hongkongensis. Freshwater fish was a reservoir of L. hongkongensis. Genotypic typing revealed the possibility of virulent clones of L. hongkongensis. The class C β-lactamase of L. hongkongensis has been cloned and characterized. Summary: In 2001, L. hongkongensis, a novel genus and species, was first discovered in Hong Kong from the blood and empyema pus of a patient with alcoholic cirrhosis. Subsequently, it was isolated from patients in other parts of the world. Recently, this bacterium was found to be associated with community-acquired gastroenteritis and traveller's diarrhoea using cefoperazone MacConkey agar as the selective medium. Further studies, including setting up of animal and tissue culture models and characterization of virulence factors, should be performed. For pathogenic microbes, even one strain of a novel species should be described, so that global concerted efforts can be drawn to look for more cases associated with such a pathogen. © 2005 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157417
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.439
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.242
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWoo, PCYen_US
dc.contributor.authorLau, SKPen_US
dc.contributor.authorTeng, JLLen_US
dc.contributor.authorYuen, KYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:49:46Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:49:46Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.citationCurrent Opinion in Infectious Diseases, 2005, v. 18 n. 5, p. 413-419en_US
dc.identifier.issn0951-7375en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157417-
dc.description.abstractPurpose of review: Despite extensive investigations, a microbiological cause cannot be found in about half of the patients with infectious disease. Throughout the years, scientists have spent tremendous efforts in looking for microorganisms associated with these 'unexplained infectious disease syndromes'. Recently, a novel bacterium, Laribacter hongkongensis, was discovered and shown to be associated with gastroenteritis and traveller's diarrhoea. This review summarizes the current status, and shares with the readers the authors' experience in the microbiology, classification, epidemiology, clinical disease, laboratory diagnosis, antibiotic resistance and treatment of L. hongkongensis. It also discusses the importance and perspective of describing novel pathogenic bacterial species. Recent findings: L. hongkongensis was shown to be associated with gastroenteritis and traveller's diarrhoea. Consumption of fish was associated with recovery of L. hongkongensis. Freshwater fish was a reservoir of L. hongkongensis. Genotypic typing revealed the possibility of virulent clones of L. hongkongensis. The class C β-lactamase of L. hongkongensis has been cloned and characterized. Summary: In 2001, L. hongkongensis, a novel genus and species, was first discovered in Hong Kong from the blood and empyema pus of a patient with alcoholic cirrhosis. Subsequently, it was isolated from patients in other parts of the world. Recently, this bacterium was found to be associated with community-acquired gastroenteritis and traveller's diarrhoea using cefoperazone MacConkey agar as the selective medium. Further studies, including setting up of animal and tissue culture models and characterization of virulence factors, should be performed. For pathogenic microbes, even one strain of a novel species should be described, so that global concerted efforts can be drawn to look for more cases associated with such a pathogen. © 2005 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.co-infectiousdiseases.comen_US
dc.relation.ispartofCurrent Opinion in Infectious Diseasesen_US
dc.rightsCurrent Opinion in Infectious Diseases. Copyright © Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.-
dc.subject.meshDiarrhea - Drug Therapy - Epidemiology - Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDrug Resistance, Bacterialen_US
dc.subject.meshGastroenteritis - Drug Therapy - Epidemiology - Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshNeisseriaceae - Classification - Drug Effects - Isolation & Purificationen_US
dc.subject.meshPhylogenyen_US
dc.subject.meshTravelen_US
dc.titleCurrent status and future directions for Laribacter hongkongensis, a novel bacterium associated with gastroenteritis and traveller's diarrhoeaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWoo, PCY: pcywoo@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLau, SKP: skplau@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailTeng, JLL: llteng@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailYuen, KY: kyyuen@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWoo, PCY=rp00430en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLau, SKP=rp00486en_US
dc.identifier.authorityTeng, JLL=rp00277en_US
dc.identifier.authorityYuen, KY=rp00366en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid16148528-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-25144501443en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros114675-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-25144501443&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume18en_US
dc.identifier.issue5en_US
dc.identifier.spage413en_US
dc.identifier.epage419en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000232603900007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWoo, PCY=7201801340en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, SKP=7401596211en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTeng, JLL=7202560229en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYuen, KY=36078079100en_US
dc.customcontrol.immutablesml 130524-

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