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Article: Hypothesis: A novel route for immortalization of epithelial cells by Epstein-Barr virus

TitleHypothesis: A novel route for immortalization of epithelial cells by Epstein-Barr virus
Authors
Issue Date2002
PublisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/onc
Citation
Oncogene, 2002, v. 21 n. 5, p. 825-835 How to Cite?
AbstractTransfection of primate tissue explants with a specific sub-fragment (p31) of EBV DNA results in epithelial (but no other) cells proliferating indefinitely (becoming 'immortalized') without evidence of a 'growth crisis'. Molecular evidence supports integration of viral information into the host chromosome, and an early genotypic alteration involving specific amplification of a sub-component (IR1) of p31 DNA, followed by apparent loss of viral DNA from chromosomes, consistent with a 'hit and run' mechanism. However, analysis at the individual cell level during long-term culture, by FISH techniques, reveals chromosomal alterations, and viral sequences surviving within double minute (DM) bodies. Changing growth patterns occurring at different stages during propagation (>a year in culture) may be explained by sporadic reintegration of surviving viral DNA into the host chromosome. Notably, throughout culture, telomere lengths in chromosomal DNAs do not alter but rather retain the length observed in the primary cell populations. Introduction of a growth stimulating function of EBV, BARF1, into the immortalized, non-clonable epithelial cells under conditions which permit overexpression, allows clonal populations to be derived. Based on the data, mechanisms of immortalization, in the absence of a proven viral oncogene in p31 DNA, and possible genes involved, are considered.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157349
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 7.932
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.047
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGao, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorLu, YJen_US
dc.contributor.authorXue, SAen_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorWedderburn, Nen_US
dc.contributor.authorGriffin, BEen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:49:08Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:49:08Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.identifier.citationOncogene, 2002, v. 21 n. 5, p. 825-835en_US
dc.identifier.issn0950-9232en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157349-
dc.description.abstractTransfection of primate tissue explants with a specific sub-fragment (p31) of EBV DNA results in epithelial (but no other) cells proliferating indefinitely (becoming 'immortalized') without evidence of a 'growth crisis'. Molecular evidence supports integration of viral information into the host chromosome, and an early genotypic alteration involving specific amplification of a sub-component (IR1) of p31 DNA, followed by apparent loss of viral DNA from chromosomes, consistent with a 'hit and run' mechanism. However, analysis at the individual cell level during long-term culture, by FISH techniques, reveals chromosomal alterations, and viral sequences surviving within double minute (DM) bodies. Changing growth patterns occurring at different stages during propagation (>a year in culture) may be explained by sporadic reintegration of surviving viral DNA into the host chromosome. Notably, throughout culture, telomere lengths in chromosomal DNAs do not alter but rather retain the length observed in the primary cell populations. Introduction of a growth stimulating function of EBV, BARF1, into the immortalized, non-clonable epithelial cells under conditions which permit overexpression, allows clonal populations to be derived. Based on the data, mechanisms of immortalization, in the absence of a proven viral oncogene in p31 DNA, and possible genes involved, are considered.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/oncen_US
dc.relation.ispartofOncogeneen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshCallithrixen_US
dc.subject.meshCell Lineen_US
dc.subject.meshCell Line, Transformeden_US
dc.subject.meshCell Transformation, Viralen_US
dc.subject.meshChromosomes - Ultrastructureen_US
dc.subject.meshClone Cellsen_US
dc.subject.meshDna, Viral - Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshEpithelial Cells - Cytology - Ultrastructure - Virologyen_US
dc.subject.meshGene Amplificationen_US
dc.subject.meshHerpesvirus 4, Human - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshIn Situ Hybridization, Fluorescenceen_US
dc.subject.meshModels, Geneticen_US
dc.subject.meshTelomere - Ultrastructureen_US
dc.subject.meshVirus Integrationen_US
dc.titleHypothesis: A novel route for immortalization of epithelial cells by Epstein-Barr virusen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChen, H:hlchen@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChen, H=rp00383en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/sj/onc/1205130en_US
dc.identifier.pmid11850810en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0037165238en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0037165238&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume21en_US
dc.identifier.issue5en_US
dc.identifier.spage825en_US
dc.identifier.epage835en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000173427000013-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGao, Y=7404705775en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLu, YJ=26643098400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXue, SA=7202789859en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, H=26643315400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWedderburn, N=24553242600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGriffin, BE=7201402684en_US

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