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Article: Adhesion and colonisation of Candida krusei on host surfaces

TitleAdhesion and colonisation of Candida krusei on host surfaces
Authors
Issue Date1994
PublisherSociety for General Microbiology. The Journal's web site is located at http://jmm.sgmjournals.org
Citation
Journal of Medical Microbiology, 1994, v. 41 n. 4, p. 250-258 How to Cite?
AbstractCandida krusei is an emerging pathogen, especially in immunocompromised hosts. As the adherence of this organism both to host epithelial surfaces and to catheter and prosthetic surfaces appears to be important in the pathogenesis of superficial as well as systemic candidoses, the adhesion of 20 oral isolates of C. krusei and five oral isolates of C. albicans was compared with the following substrates: cultured (HeLa) epithelial cells, buccal epithelial cells (BEG) from healthy adults and bone marrow transplant patients, and acrylic (polymethylmethacrylate) surfaces. Animal experiments in Sprague Dawley rats were also conducted to evaluate the relative oral carriage rate of the two Candida spp. C. krusei isolates adhered in far greater numbers to acrylic surfaces than to either of the cell surfaces. Significant intra-species differences in C. krusei adhesion for acrylic surfaces were noted between 74 (39 %) of 190 pair comparisons in contrast to 18 (9.5 %) of 190 with HeLa surfaces (p < 0.05). A positive correlation was also observed between the adhesion of C. krusei isolates to HeLa cells and acrylic surfaces. Five isolates of C. albicans showed very low adherence to HeLa surfaces when compared with BEC obtained from either healthy individuals or bone marrow transplant patients. The adherence of C, albicans to BEC from the healthy individuals was c. 12-fold greater than that of C. krusei, a figure similar to the relative murine oral carriage rate of the two Candida spp. However, the adhesion of C. albicans to BEC from bone marrow transplant patients was three-fold less than to BEC of healthy individuals whilst C. krusei adhesion remained the same, reflecting a possible selective colonisation process which may operate in these patient groups, possibly as a result of drug therapy. The current data, while confirming the inter- and intra-species differences in adherence of Candida spp. to host surfaces, illustrate that adherence-related factors may operate during colonisation of C. krusei on mucosal, catheter and prosthetic surfaces, in vivo in both health and disease.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157267
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.269
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.060
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSamaranayake, YHen_US
dc.contributor.authorWu, PCen_US
dc.contributor.authorSamaranayake, LPen_US
dc.contributor.authorSo, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorYuen, KYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:48:31Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:48:31Z-
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Medical Microbiology, 1994, v. 41 n. 4, p. 250-258en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-2615en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157267-
dc.description.abstractCandida krusei is an emerging pathogen, especially in immunocompromised hosts. As the adherence of this organism both to host epithelial surfaces and to catheter and prosthetic surfaces appears to be important in the pathogenesis of superficial as well as systemic candidoses, the adhesion of 20 oral isolates of C. krusei and five oral isolates of C. albicans was compared with the following substrates: cultured (HeLa) epithelial cells, buccal epithelial cells (BEG) from healthy adults and bone marrow transplant patients, and acrylic (polymethylmethacrylate) surfaces. Animal experiments in Sprague Dawley rats were also conducted to evaluate the relative oral carriage rate of the two Candida spp. C. krusei isolates adhered in far greater numbers to acrylic surfaces than to either of the cell surfaces. Significant intra-species differences in C. krusei adhesion for acrylic surfaces were noted between 74 (39 %) of 190 pair comparisons in contrast to 18 (9.5 %) of 190 with HeLa surfaces (p < 0.05). A positive correlation was also observed between the adhesion of C. krusei isolates to HeLa cells and acrylic surfaces. Five isolates of C. albicans showed very low adherence to HeLa surfaces when compared with BEC obtained from either healthy individuals or bone marrow transplant patients. The adherence of C, albicans to BEC from the healthy individuals was c. 12-fold greater than that of C. krusei, a figure similar to the relative murine oral carriage rate of the two Candida spp. However, the adhesion of C. albicans to BEC from bone marrow transplant patients was three-fold less than to BEC of healthy individuals whilst C. krusei adhesion remained the same, reflecting a possible selective colonisation process which may operate in these patient groups, possibly as a result of drug therapy. The current data, while confirming the inter- and intra-species differences in adherence of Candida spp. to host surfaces, illustrate that adherence-related factors may operate during colonisation of C. krusei on mucosal, catheter and prosthetic surfaces, in vivo in both health and disease.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSociety for General Microbiology. The Journal's web site is located at http://jmm.sgmjournals.orgen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Medical Microbiologyen_US
dc.rightsThe Journal of Medical Microbiology. Copyright © Society for General Microbiology.-
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshBone Marrow Transplantationen_US
dc.subject.meshCandida - Pathogenicityen_US
dc.subject.meshCandida Albicans - Pathogenicityen_US
dc.subject.meshCandidiasis, Oral - Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCarrier State - Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCell Adhesionen_US
dc.subject.meshCohort Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshEpithelial Cellsen_US
dc.subject.meshEpithelium - Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHela Cellsen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshImmunocompromised Hosten_US
dc.subject.meshMethylmethacrylates - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshMouth Mucosa - Cytology - Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshRatsen_US
dc.subject.meshRats, Sprague-Dawleyen_US
dc.subject.meshVirulenceen_US
dc.titleAdhesion and colonisation of Candida krusei on host surfacesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0022-2615&volume=41&issue=4&spage=250&epage=258&date=1994&atitle=The+adhesion+and+colonisation+of+Candida+krusei+on+host+surfaces-
dc.identifier.emailSamaranayake, YH:hema@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailSamaranayake, LP:lakshman@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailYuen, KY:kyyuen@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySamaranayake, YH=rp00025en_US
dc.identifier.authoritySamaranayake, LP=rp00023en_US
dc.identifier.authorityYuen, KY=rp00366en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1099/00222615-41-4-250-
dc.identifier.pmid7932617-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0028126598en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros3549-
dc.identifier.hkuros6280-
dc.identifier.volume41en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage250en_US
dc.identifier.epage258en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1994PM99400007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSamaranayake, YH=6602677237en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWu, PC=7403119323en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSamaranayake, LP=7102761002en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSo, M=36719004800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYuen, KY=36078079100en_US

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