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Article: The influence of building height variability on pollutant dispersion and pedestrian ventilation in idealized high-rise urban areas
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TitleThe influence of building height variability on pollutant dispersion and pedestrian ventilation in idealized high-rise urban areas
 
AuthorsHang, J1 4
Li, Y1
Sandberg, M2
Buccolieri, R3
Disabatino, S3
 
KeywordsBuilding height
Building layout
Canopy heights
Cfd simulations
Ground-level
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/buildenv
 
CitationBuilding and Environment, 2012, v. 56, p. 346-360 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.buildenv.2012.03.023
 
AbstractStudies are still required to understand how rural/marine wind remove ground-level pollutants released uniformly in street networks of high-rise urban areas. The link between building height variability and pollutant removal process still remains unclear. Several idealized urban-like neighbourhoods made of 9-row and 18-row small-scale high-rise square arrays (building width B = street width W, building packing density λ p = 0.25) were first numerically studied with a parallel approaching wind and neglecting thermal effects. Normalized pollutant transport rates and pedestrian purging flow rate were applied to quantify the contribution of pollutant removal by mean flow and turbulent diffusion and their net purging capacity. Results show that the prediction of isothermal turbulent flows agreed generally well with wind tunnel data. For 9-row arrays with building height variations (standard deviation of 0-57.1%) and the same average canopy height (H 0 = 2.33W), pollutant removal mainly depends on mean flows. Larger standard deviations tend to induce better pedestrian ventilation. In comparison to small and large standard deviations, medium values of 14.3-42.9% may experience smaller purging capacity by horizontal mean flows but significantly enhance that by vertical mean flows. For arrays with uniform heights, lowering aspect ratios (H/W = 2.33 and 2.67-1.5) or increasing street lengths (9-row to 18-row) may enhance the contribution of removing pollutants by turbulent diffusions across canopy roofs which may be similarly important as that by mean flows. Although further investigations are still required, this paper clarifies the relationship between building layouts, height variability and removal potential of ground-level pollutants in high-rise urban-like geometries. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.
 
ISSN0360-1323
2012 Impact Factor: 2.43
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.267
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.buildenv.2012.03.023
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000305315700036
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Small Project Funding from University of Hong Kong201007176175
project title of "Quantifying the effect of building height variation on pollutant removal and heat removal from high-rise compact building arrays"
National Natural Science Foundation of China51108102
Funding Information:

This study was financially supported by the Small Project Funding from the University of Hong Kong (Project code: 201007176175) with the project title of "Quantifying the effect of building height variation on pollutant removal and heat removal from high-rise compact building arrays" and by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51108102). The special concern from the Planning Department of Hong Kong Government is also gratefully acknowledged.

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorHang, J
 
dc.contributor.authorLi, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorSandberg, M
 
dc.contributor.authorBuccolieri, R
 
dc.contributor.authorDisabatino, S
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:45:45Z
 
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:45:45Z
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractStudies are still required to understand how rural/marine wind remove ground-level pollutants released uniformly in street networks of high-rise urban areas. The link between building height variability and pollutant removal process still remains unclear. Several idealized urban-like neighbourhoods made of 9-row and 18-row small-scale high-rise square arrays (building width B = street width W, building packing density λ p = 0.25) were first numerically studied with a parallel approaching wind and neglecting thermal effects. Normalized pollutant transport rates and pedestrian purging flow rate were applied to quantify the contribution of pollutant removal by mean flow and turbulent diffusion and their net purging capacity. Results show that the prediction of isothermal turbulent flows agreed generally well with wind tunnel data. For 9-row arrays with building height variations (standard deviation of 0-57.1%) and the same average canopy height (H 0 = 2.33W), pollutant removal mainly depends on mean flows. Larger standard deviations tend to induce better pedestrian ventilation. In comparison to small and large standard deviations, medium values of 14.3-42.9% may experience smaller purging capacity by horizontal mean flows but significantly enhance that by vertical mean flows. For arrays with uniform heights, lowering aspect ratios (H/W = 2.33 and 2.67-1.5) or increasing street lengths (9-row to 18-row) may enhance the contribution of removing pollutants by turbulent diffusions across canopy roofs which may be similarly important as that by mean flows. Although further investigations are still required, this paper clarifies the relationship between building layouts, height variability and removal potential of ground-level pollutants in high-rise urban-like geometries. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationBuilding and Environment, 2012, v. 56, p. 346-360 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.buildenv.2012.03.023
 
dc.identifier.citeulike10621312
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.buildenv.2012.03.023
 
dc.identifier.epage360
 
dc.identifier.hkuros209883
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000305315700036
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Small Project Funding from University of Hong Kong201007176175
project title of "Quantifying the effect of building height variation on pollutant removal and heat removal from high-rise compact building arrays"
National Natural Science Foundation of China51108102
Funding Information:

This study was financially supported by the Small Project Funding from the University of Hong Kong (Project code: 201007176175) with the project title of "Quantifying the effect of building height variation on pollutant removal and heat removal from high-rise compact building arrays" and by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51108102). The special concern from the Planning Department of Hong Kong Government is also gratefully acknowledged.

 
dc.identifier.issn0360-1323
2012 Impact Factor: 2.43
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.267
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84860304696
 
dc.identifier.spage346
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157193
 
dc.identifier.volume56
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/buildenv
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofBuilding and Environment
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subjectBuilding height
 
dc.subjectBuilding layout
 
dc.subjectCanopy heights
 
dc.subjectCfd simulations
 
dc.subjectGround-level
 
dc.titleThe influence of building height variability on pollutant dispersion and pedestrian ventilation in idealized high-rise urban areas
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Li, Y</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Sandberg, M</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Buccolieri, R</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Disabatino, S</contributor.author>
<date.accessioned>2012-08-08T08:45:45Z</date.accessioned>
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<description.abstract>Studies are still required to understand how rural/marine wind remove ground-level pollutants released uniformly in street networks of high-rise urban areas. The link between building height variability and pollutant removal process still remains unclear. Several idealized urban-like neighbourhoods made of 9-row and 18-row small-scale high-rise square arrays (building width B = street width W, building packing density &#955; p = 0.25) were first numerically studied with a parallel approaching wind and neglecting thermal effects. Normalized pollutant transport rates and pedestrian purging flow rate were applied to quantify the contribution of pollutant removal by mean flow and turbulent diffusion and their net purging capacity. Results show that the prediction of isothermal turbulent flows agreed generally well with wind tunnel data. For 9-row arrays with building height variations (standard deviation of 0-57.1%) and the same average canopy height (H 0 = 2.33W), pollutant removal mainly depends on mean flows. Larger standard deviations tend to induce better pedestrian ventilation. In comparison to small and large standard deviations, medium values of 14.3-42.9% may experience smaller purging capacity by horizontal mean flows but significantly enhance that by vertical mean flows. For arrays with uniform heights, lowering aspect ratios (H/W = 2.33 and 2.67-1.5) or increasing street lengths (9-row to 18-row) may enhance the contribution of removing pollutants by turbulent diffusions across canopy roofs which may be similarly important as that by mean flows. Although further investigations are still required, this paper clarifies the relationship between building layouts, height variability and removal potential of ground-level pollutants in high-rise urban-like geometries. &#169; 2012 Elsevier Ltd.</description.abstract>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Hogskolan i Gavle
  3. null
  4. Guangzhou University