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Article: Displacement ventilation in hospital environments
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TitleDisplacement ventilation in hospital environments
 
AuthorsLi, Y1
Nielsen, PV3
Sandberg, M2
 
KeywordsDisplacement ventilation
Dual role
Floor level
Hospital environment
Infected patients
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherAmerican Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc.
 
CitationASHRAE Journal, 2011, v. 53 n. 6, p. 86-88 [How to Cite?]
 
AbstractExperts suggest that displacement ventilation can play a key role in providing better ventilation facilities in hospital environments. Designers need to consider that hospitals differ from conventional buildings in terms of ventilation needs. Exhaled infectious droplets or droplet nuclei of an infected patient need to be removed in general wards, waiting areas and isolation rooms to minimize transmission to health-care workers, other patients and visitors. The supply air is provided via a floor level opening at a low velocity in displacement ventilation The only way for air and pollutants to transport from the lower to upper zone is via the plumes that penetrate the interface. Displacement ventilation creates a flow pattern that makes it difficult for a pollutant released in the upper zone to spread to the lower one. The stable thermal stratification zone plays a dual role for displacement ventilation.
 
DescriptionIAQ applications
 
ISSN0001-2491
2012 Impact Factor: 0.26
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.413
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLi, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorNielsen, PV
 
dc.contributor.authorSandberg, M
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:45:36Z
 
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:45:36Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractExperts suggest that displacement ventilation can play a key role in providing better ventilation facilities in hospital environments. Designers need to consider that hospitals differ from conventional buildings in terms of ventilation needs. Exhaled infectious droplets or droplet nuclei of an infected patient need to be removed in general wards, waiting areas and isolation rooms to minimize transmission to health-care workers, other patients and visitors. The supply air is provided via a floor level opening at a low velocity in displacement ventilation The only way for air and pollutants to transport from the lower to upper zone is via the plumes that penetrate the interface. Displacement ventilation creates a flow pattern that makes it difficult for a pollutant released in the upper zone to spread to the lower one. The stable thermal stratification zone plays a dual role for displacement ventilation.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.descriptionIAQ applications
 
dc.identifier.citationASHRAE Journal, 2011, v. 53 n. 6, p. 86-88 [How to Cite?]
 
dc.identifier.epage88
 
dc.identifier.hkuros209888
 
dc.identifier.issn0001-2491
2012 Impact Factor: 0.26
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.413
 
dc.identifier.issue6
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-83455181957
 
dc.identifier.spage86
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157161
 
dc.identifier.volume53
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherAmerican Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc.
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofASHRAE Journal
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subjectDisplacement ventilation
 
dc.subjectDual role
 
dc.subjectFloor level
 
dc.subjectHospital environment
 
dc.subjectInfected patients
 
dc.titleDisplacement ventilation in hospital environments
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Hogskolan i Gavle
  3. Aalborg Universitet