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Article: Macroscopic simulations of turbulent flows through high-rise building arrays using a porous turbulence model
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TitleMacroscopic simulations of turbulent flows through high-rise building arrays using a porous turbulence model
 
AuthorsHang, J1 2
Li, Y1
 
KeywordsAir volumes
Building array
Building height
Computational loads
Computational requirements
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/buildenv
 
CitationBuilding and Environment, 2012, v. 49 n. 1, p. 41-54 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.buildenv.2011.09.013
 
AbstractWind flowing through urban areas may help diluting pollutants in street networks. General microscopic numerical techniques have difficulty in simulating wind through city-scale urban areas with thousands of buildings because the required computational load is difficult to afford. We considered urban canopy layers with buildings and street networks as porous media and used a porous turbulence model to macroscopically study urban airflows. High-rise porous building arrays with uniform building heights or building height variations were studied (building height/street width, i.e. H/W = 2 or 2.67; the porosity or the fraction of air volume in urban areas is = 0.75). A single domain approach was used to account for the interface conditions. Microscopic simulations using RANS k-e{open} turbulence model and validated by wind tunnel data were also carried out to model the form drag produced by buildings and calculate spatially-averaged flow quantities to estimate macroscopic simulation results using the porous turbulence model. Results showed that, with a parallel approaching wind, the present porous turbulence model may predict macroscopic mean flows through porous building array generally well if suitable porous parameters are modelled, meanwhile, some microscopic flow information is lost but the computational requirements are effectively reduced. With a power-law approaching wind, a taller porous building array may experience greater macroscopic velocity if the length of porous region is effectively limited. Further investigations are still required to evaluate macroscopic turbulence predictions and apply present porous turbulence model for real urban areas or cities with various wind directions. © 2011.
 
ISSN0360-1323
2013 Impact Factor: 2.700
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.634
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.buildenv.2011.09.013
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000298200600006
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University of Hong Kong on Initiative of Clean Energy for Environment
Funding Information:

The work in this paper is supported by a University Development Fund from the University of Hong Kong on Initiative of Clean Energy for Environment. The support from Prof Mats Sandberg in KTH research school, University of Gavle in wind tunnel measurements is highly acknowledged.

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorHang, J
 
dc.contributor.authorLi, Y
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:45:33Z
 
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:45:33Z
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractWind flowing through urban areas may help diluting pollutants in street networks. General microscopic numerical techniques have difficulty in simulating wind through city-scale urban areas with thousands of buildings because the required computational load is difficult to afford. We considered urban canopy layers with buildings and street networks as porous media and used a porous turbulence model to macroscopically study urban airflows. High-rise porous building arrays with uniform building heights or building height variations were studied (building height/street width, i.e. H/W = 2 or 2.67; the porosity or the fraction of air volume in urban areas is = 0.75). A single domain approach was used to account for the interface conditions. Microscopic simulations using RANS k-e{open} turbulence model and validated by wind tunnel data were also carried out to model the form drag produced by buildings and calculate spatially-averaged flow quantities to estimate macroscopic simulation results using the porous turbulence model. Results showed that, with a parallel approaching wind, the present porous turbulence model may predict macroscopic mean flows through porous building array generally well if suitable porous parameters are modelled, meanwhile, some microscopic flow information is lost but the computational requirements are effectively reduced. With a power-law approaching wind, a taller porous building array may experience greater macroscopic velocity if the length of porous region is effectively limited. Further investigations are still required to evaluate macroscopic turbulence predictions and apply present porous turbulence model for real urban areas or cities with various wind directions. © 2011.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationBuilding and Environment, 2012, v. 49 n. 1, p. 41-54 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.buildenv.2011.09.013
 
dc.identifier.citeulike9834169
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.buildenv.2011.09.013
 
dc.identifier.epage54
 
dc.identifier.hkuros205321
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000298200600006
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University of Hong Kong on Initiative of Clean Energy for Environment
Funding Information:

The work in this paper is supported by a University Development Fund from the University of Hong Kong on Initiative of Clean Energy for Environment. The support from Prof Mats Sandberg in KTH research school, University of Gavle in wind tunnel measurements is highly acknowledged.

 
dc.identifier.issn0360-1323
2013 Impact Factor: 2.700
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.634
 
dc.identifier.issue1
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80054068185
 
dc.identifier.spage41
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157150
 
dc.identifier.volume49
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/buildenv
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofBuilding and Environment
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subjectAir volumes
 
dc.subjectBuilding array
 
dc.subjectBuilding height
 
dc.subjectComputational loads
 
dc.subjectComputational requirements
 
dc.titleMacroscopic simulations of turbulent flows through high-rise building arrays using a porous turbulence model
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Guangzhou University