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Article: CFD and ventilation research
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TitleCFD and ventilation research
 
AuthorsLi, Y2
Nielsen, PV1
 
KeywordsAnalysis
Building Ventilation
Computational Fluid Dynamics
Experiment
Theory
Validation
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherBlackwell Munksgaard. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/INA
 
CitationIndoor Air, 2011, v. 21 n. 6, p. 442-453 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0668.2011.00723.x
 
AbstractThere has been a rapid growth of scientific literature on the application of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in the research of ventilation and indoor air science. With a 1000-10,000 times increase in computer hardware capability in the past 20 years, CFD has become an integral part of scientific research and engineering development of complex air distribution and ventilation systems in buildings. This review discusses the major and specific challenges of CFD in terms of turbulence modelling, numerical approximation, and boundary conditions relevant to building ventilation. We emphasize the growing need for CFD verification and validation, suggest ongoing needs for analytical and experimental methods to support the numerical solutions, and discuss the growing capacity of CFD in opening up new research areas. We suggest that CFD has not become a replacement for experiment and theoretical analysis in ventilation research, rather it has become an increasingly important partner. Practical Implications: We believe that an effective scientific approach for ventilation studies is still to combine experiments, theory, and CFD. We argue that CFD verification and validation are becoming more crucial than ever as more complex ventilation problems are solved. It is anticipated that ventilation problems at the city scale will be tackled by CFD in the next 10 years. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.
 
ISSN0905-6947
2013 Impact Factor: 4.202
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0668.2011.00723.x
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000297417800002
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLi, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorNielsen, PV
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:45:26Z
 
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:45:26Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractThere has been a rapid growth of scientific literature on the application of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in the research of ventilation and indoor air science. With a 1000-10,000 times increase in computer hardware capability in the past 20 years, CFD has become an integral part of scientific research and engineering development of complex air distribution and ventilation systems in buildings. This review discusses the major and specific challenges of CFD in terms of turbulence modelling, numerical approximation, and boundary conditions relevant to building ventilation. We emphasize the growing need for CFD verification and validation, suggest ongoing needs for analytical and experimental methods to support the numerical solutions, and discuss the growing capacity of CFD in opening up new research areas. We suggest that CFD has not become a replacement for experiment and theoretical analysis in ventilation research, rather it has become an increasingly important partner. Practical Implications: We believe that an effective scientific approach for ventilation studies is still to combine experiments, theory, and CFD. We argue that CFD verification and validation are becoming more crucial than ever as more complex ventilation problems are solved. It is anticipated that ventilation problems at the city scale will be tackled by CFD in the next 10 years. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationIndoor Air, 2011, v. 21 n. 6, p. 442-453 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0668.2011.00723.x
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0668.2011.00723.x
 
dc.identifier.epage453
 
dc.identifier.hkuros209891
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000297417800002
 
dc.identifier.issn0905-6947
2013 Impact Factor: 4.202
 
dc.identifier.issue6
 
dc.identifier.pmid21585552
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84862833141
 
dc.identifier.spage442
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157125
 
dc.identifier.volume21
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherBlackwell Munksgaard. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/INA
 
dc.publisher.placeDenmark
 
dc.relation.ispartofIndoor Air
 
dc.subject.meshAir Movements
 
dc.subject.meshAir Pollution, Indoor - analysis - prevention & control
 
dc.subject.meshComputer Simulation
 
dc.subject.meshEngineering - methods - trends
 
dc.subject.meshHousing
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshModels, Theoretical
 
dc.subject.meshResearch Design
 
dc.subject.meshVentilation - instrumentation - methods
 
dc.subjectAnalysis
 
dc.subjectBuilding Ventilation
 
dc.subjectComputational Fluid Dynamics
 
dc.subjectExperiment
 
dc.subjectTheory
 
dc.subjectValidation
 
dc.titleCFD and ventilation research
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Nielsen, PV</contributor.author>
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<date.issued>2011</date.issued>
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<description.abstract>There has been a rapid growth of scientific literature on the application of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in the research of ventilation and indoor air science. With a 1000-10,000 times increase in computer hardware capability in the past 20 years, CFD has become an integral part of scientific research and engineering development of complex air distribution and ventilation systems in buildings. This review discusses the major and specific challenges of CFD in terms of turbulence modelling, numerical approximation, and boundary conditions relevant to building ventilation. We emphasize the growing need for CFD verification and validation, suggest ongoing needs for analytical and experimental methods to support the numerical solutions, and discuss the growing capacity of CFD in opening up new research areas. We suggest that CFD has not become a replacement for experiment and theoretical analysis in ventilation research, rather it has become an increasingly important partner. Practical Implications: We believe that an effective scientific approach for ventilation studies is still to combine experiments, theory, and CFD. We argue that CFD verification and validation are becoming more crucial than ever as more complex ventilation problems are solved. It is anticipated that ventilation problems at the city scale will be tackled by CFD in the next 10 years. &#169; 2011 John Wiley &amp; Sons A/S.</description.abstract>
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<subject.mesh>Computer Simulation</subject.mesh>
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Author Affiliations
  1. Aalborg Universitet
  2. The University of Hong Kong