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Article: Heat conduction in nanofluids: Structure-property correlation

TitleHeat conduction in nanofluids: Structure-property correlation
Authors
KeywordsEffective Thermal Conductivity
Heat Conduction
Microstructure
Nanofluids
Phase Lags
Issue Date2011
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ijhmt
Citation
International Journal Of Heat And Mass Transfer, 2011, v. 54 n. 19-20, p. 4349-4359 How to Cite?
AbstractWe examine numerically the effects of particle-fluid thermal conductivity ratio, particle volume fraction, and particle morphology on nanofluids effective thermal conductivity and phase lags of heat flux and temperature gradient, for six types of nanofluids containing sphere, cube, hollow sphere, hollow cube, slab-cross and column-cross nanoparticles, respectively. The particle's radius of gyration and the non-dimensional particle-fluid interfacial area are found to be two characteristic parameters for the effect of particles' geometrical structure on the effective thermal conductivity. The nanoparticles with larger values of these two parameters can change fluid conductivity more significantly. Due to the enhanced particle-fluid interfacial heat transfer, the nanofluid effective thermal conductivity can practically reach the Hashin-Shtrikman bounds when the particle-phase connects to form a network and separates the base fluid into a dispersed phase. The particle aggregation can effectively affect the effective thermal conductivity when the separation distance among particles is smaller than about one fifth of the particles' dimension. For the nanofluids considered in the present work, the phase lags of heat flux and temperature gradient scale with the square of particle dimension and range from 10 -11 s to 10-7 s; the effect of cross-coupling between the heat conduction in the fluid and particle phases is weak; the phase lag of temperature gradient is larger than that of heat flux such that the heat conduction in them is diffusion-dominant and their effective thermal conductivity can be well predicted by the predictive models developed in the present work based on the classical diffusion theory for two-phase systems. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157124
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.857
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.749
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Research Grants Council of Hong KongGRF718009
Funding Information:

The financial support from the Research Grants Council of Hong Kong (GRF718009) is gratefully acknowledged.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFan, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, Len_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:45:26Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:45:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Heat And Mass Transfer, 2011, v. 54 n. 19-20, p. 4349-4359en_US
dc.identifier.issn0017-9310en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157124-
dc.description.abstractWe examine numerically the effects of particle-fluid thermal conductivity ratio, particle volume fraction, and particle morphology on nanofluids effective thermal conductivity and phase lags of heat flux and temperature gradient, for six types of nanofluids containing sphere, cube, hollow sphere, hollow cube, slab-cross and column-cross nanoparticles, respectively. The particle's radius of gyration and the non-dimensional particle-fluid interfacial area are found to be two characteristic parameters for the effect of particles' geometrical structure on the effective thermal conductivity. The nanoparticles with larger values of these two parameters can change fluid conductivity more significantly. Due to the enhanced particle-fluid interfacial heat transfer, the nanofluid effective thermal conductivity can practically reach the Hashin-Shtrikman bounds when the particle-phase connects to form a network and separates the base fluid into a dispersed phase. The particle aggregation can effectively affect the effective thermal conductivity when the separation distance among particles is smaller than about one fifth of the particles' dimension. For the nanofluids considered in the present work, the phase lags of heat flux and temperature gradient scale with the square of particle dimension and range from 10 -11 s to 10-7 s; the effect of cross-coupling between the heat conduction in the fluid and particle phases is weak; the phase lag of temperature gradient is larger than that of heat flux such that the heat conduction in them is diffusion-dominant and their effective thermal conductivity can be well predicted by the predictive models developed in the present work based on the classical diffusion theory for two-phase systems. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ijhmten_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Heat and Mass Transferen_US
dc.subjectEffective Thermal Conductivityen_US
dc.subjectHeat Conductionen_US
dc.subjectMicrostructureen_US
dc.subjectNanofluidsen_US
dc.subjectPhase Lagsen_US
dc.titleHeat conduction in nanofluids: Structure-property correlationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWang, L:lqwang@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWang, L=rp00184en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2011.05.009en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79959749782en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79959749782&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume54en_US
dc.identifier.issue19-20en_US
dc.identifier.spage4349en_US
dc.identifier.epage4359en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1879-2189-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000293108300021-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFan, J=36019048800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, L=35235288500en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike9419381-

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