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Article: Review of heat conduction in nanofluids

TitleReview of heat conduction in nanofluids
Authors
KeywordsDual-Phase-Lagging
Experiments
Heat Conduction
Models
Nanofluids
Thermal Wave
Issue Date2011
PublisherA S M E International. The Journal's web site is located at http://ojps.aip.org/ASMEJournals/HeatTransfer
Citation
Journal Of Heat Transfer, 2011, v. 133 n. 4 How to Cite?
AbstractNanofluids-fluid suspensions of nanometer-sized particles-are a very important area of emerging technology and are playing an increasingly important role in the continuing advances of nanotechnology and biotechnology worldwide. They have enormously exciting potential applications and may revolutionize the field of heat transfer. This review is on the advances in our understanding of heat-conduction process in nanofluids. The emphasis centers on the thermal conductivity of nanofluids: its experimental data, proposed mechanisms responsible for its enhancement, and its predicting models. A relatively intensified effort has been made on determining thermal conductivity of nanofluids from experiments. While the detailed microstructure-conductivity relationship is still unknown, the data from these experiments have enabled some trends to be identified. Suggested microscopic reasons for the experimental finding of significant conductivity enhancement include the nanoparticle Brownian motion, the Brownian-motion-induced convection, the liquid layering at the liquid-particle interface, and the nanoparticle cluster/aggregate. Although there is a lack of agreement regarding the role of the first three effects, the last effect is generally accepted to be responsible for the reported conductivity enhancement. The available models of predicting conductivity of nanofluids all involve some empirical parameters that negate their predicting ability and application. The recently developed first-principles theory of thermal waves offers not only a macroscopic reason for experimental observations but also a model governing the microstructure-conductivity relationship without involving any empirical parameter. © 2011 American Society of Mechanical Engineers.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157101
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.723
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.024
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Research Grants Council of Hong KongGRF718009
GRF717508
Funding Information:

The financial support from the Research Grants Council of Hong Kong (Grant Nos. GRF718009 and GRF717508) is gratefully acknowledged.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFan, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, Len_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:45:20Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:45:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Heat Transfer, 2011, v. 133 n. 4en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-1481en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157101-
dc.description.abstractNanofluids-fluid suspensions of nanometer-sized particles-are a very important area of emerging technology and are playing an increasingly important role in the continuing advances of nanotechnology and biotechnology worldwide. They have enormously exciting potential applications and may revolutionize the field of heat transfer. This review is on the advances in our understanding of heat-conduction process in nanofluids. The emphasis centers on the thermal conductivity of nanofluids: its experimental data, proposed mechanisms responsible for its enhancement, and its predicting models. A relatively intensified effort has been made on determining thermal conductivity of nanofluids from experiments. While the detailed microstructure-conductivity relationship is still unknown, the data from these experiments have enabled some trends to be identified. Suggested microscopic reasons for the experimental finding of significant conductivity enhancement include the nanoparticle Brownian motion, the Brownian-motion-induced convection, the liquid layering at the liquid-particle interface, and the nanoparticle cluster/aggregate. Although there is a lack of agreement regarding the role of the first three effects, the last effect is generally accepted to be responsible for the reported conductivity enhancement. The available models of predicting conductivity of nanofluids all involve some empirical parameters that negate their predicting ability and application. The recently developed first-principles theory of thermal waves offers not only a macroscopic reason for experimental observations but also a model governing the microstructure-conductivity relationship without involving any empirical parameter. © 2011 American Society of Mechanical Engineers.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherA S M E International. The Journal's web site is located at http://ojps.aip.org/ASMEJournals/HeatTransferen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Heat Transferen_US
dc.subjectDual-Phase-Laggingen_US
dc.subjectExperimentsen_US
dc.subjectHeat Conductionen_US
dc.subjectModelsen_US
dc.subjectNanofluidsen_US
dc.subjectThermal Waveen_US
dc.titleReview of heat conduction in nanofluidsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWang, L:lqwang@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWang, L=rp00184en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1115/1.4002633en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-78651390164en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-78651390164&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume133en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1528-8943-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000286431600001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFan, J=36019048800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, L=35235288500en_US

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