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Article: Vehicular exhaust gas-to-nanoparticle conversion and concentration distribution in the vehicle wake region

TitleVehicular exhaust gas-to-nanoparticle conversion and concentration distribution in the vehicle wake region
Authors
KeywordsAerosol Dynamics And Dispersion Model
Binary Homogeneous Nucleation
Large Eddy Simulation
Sulfur Content In Diesel Fuel
Vehicle Wake Region
Vehicular Exhaust Jet Particle
Issue Date2010
PublisherFreund Publishing House, Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ijnsns.com/
Citation
International Journal of Nonlinear Sciences And Numerical Simulation, 2010, v. 11 n. 8, p. 581-593 How to Cite?
AbstractIn the present study, the interaction effects of different sulfur contents, relative humidities, driving modes and vehicular exhaust tailpipe exit conditions on the three-dimensional exhaust gas-to-nanoparticle conversion and concentration distribution in the wake region of a typical bus-shaped vehicle in urban road microenvironments were comprehensively simulated using large eddy simulation (LES) coupled with the aerosol dynamics and turbulent dispersion model. Time-scale analysis of coagulation, nucleation and turbulent dispersion processes in the near-wake region of the studied vehicle show that the coagulation process is slowest and generally can be neglected. On the other hand, nucleation process is taken place much faster (i.e., nanoseconds) which makes the normal time integration method impractical. A time filtering (averaging) method was developed to tackle the extreme fast nucleation problem. Numerical results show that more than 95% (by number concentration) nanoparticles are generated in the region with temperature of 310-320K. The higher vehicle speed will also decrease the number concentration of nanoparticles. However, lower exhaust gas temperature will produce more nanoparticles. A reduction of sulfur content in diesel fuel from 500 ppm to 50 ppm will decrease the number concentration of nanoparticles more than 1000 times. ©Freund Publishing House Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157096
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.687
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.298
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, TLen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhou, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorLin, JZen_US
dc.contributor.authorLiu, CHen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:45:19Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:45:19Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Nonlinear Sciences And Numerical Simulation, 2010, v. 11 n. 8, p. 581-593en_US
dc.identifier.issn1565-1339en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157096-
dc.description.abstractIn the present study, the interaction effects of different sulfur contents, relative humidities, driving modes and vehicular exhaust tailpipe exit conditions on the three-dimensional exhaust gas-to-nanoparticle conversion and concentration distribution in the wake region of a typical bus-shaped vehicle in urban road microenvironments were comprehensively simulated using large eddy simulation (LES) coupled with the aerosol dynamics and turbulent dispersion model. Time-scale analysis of coagulation, nucleation and turbulent dispersion processes in the near-wake region of the studied vehicle show that the coagulation process is slowest and generally can be neglected. On the other hand, nucleation process is taken place much faster (i.e., nanoseconds) which makes the normal time integration method impractical. A time filtering (averaging) method was developed to tackle the extreme fast nucleation problem. Numerical results show that more than 95% (by number concentration) nanoparticles are generated in the region with temperature of 310-320K. The higher vehicle speed will also decrease the number concentration of nanoparticles. However, lower exhaust gas temperature will produce more nanoparticles. A reduction of sulfur content in diesel fuel from 500 ppm to 50 ppm will decrease the number concentration of nanoparticles more than 1000 times. ©Freund Publishing House Ltd.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherFreund Publishing House, Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ijnsns.com/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Nonlinear Sciences and Numerical Simulationen_US
dc.subjectAerosol Dynamics And Dispersion Modelen_US
dc.subjectBinary Homogeneous Nucleationen_US
dc.subjectLarge Eddy Simulationen_US
dc.subjectSulfur Content In Diesel Fuelen_US
dc.subjectVehicle Wake Regionen_US
dc.subjectVehicular Exhaust Jet Particleen_US
dc.titleVehicular exhaust gas-to-nanoparticle conversion and concentration distribution in the vehicle wake regionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, TL: mmtlchan@inet.polyu.edu.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLiu, CH: chliu@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLiu, CH=rp00152en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1515/IJNSNS.2010.11.8.581-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-78649498662en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros179331-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-78649498662&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume11en_US
dc.identifier.issue8en_US
dc.identifier.spage581en_US
dc.identifier.epage593en_US
dc.publisher.placeIsraelen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, TL=24449153000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhou, K=7202915241en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLin, JZ=35324715800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, CH=36065161300en_US

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