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Article: Modeling bioheat transport at macroscale

TitleModeling bioheat transport at macroscale
Authors
KeywordsBioheat Transport
Blood-Tissue Interaction
Dual-Phase-Lagging
Macroscale
Mixture Theory
Modeling
Porous-Media Theory
Issue Date2011
PublisherA S M E International. The Journal's web site is located at http://ojps.aip.org/ASMEJournals/HeatTransfer
Citation
Journal Of Heat Transfer, 2011, v. 133 n. 1 How to Cite?
AbstractMacroscale thermal models have been developed for biological tissues either by the mixture theory of continuum mechanics or by the porous-media theory. The former uses scaling-down from the global scale; the latter applies scaling-up from the microscale by the volume averaging. The used constitutive relations for heat flux density vector include the Fourier law, the Cattaneo-Vernotte (Cattaneo, C., 1958, "A Form of Heat Conduction Equation Which Eliminates the Paradox of Instantaneous Propagation," Compt. Rend., 247, pp. 431-433; Vernotte, P., 1958, "Les Paradoxes de la Th́orie Continue de I'equation de la Chaleur," Compt. Rend., 246, pp. 3154-3155) theory, and the dual-phase-lagging theory. The developed models contain, for example, the Pennes (1948, "Analysis of Tissue and Arterial Blood Temperature in the Resting Human Forearm," J. Appl. Physiol., 1, pp. 93-122), Wulff (1974, "The Energy Conservation Equation for Living Tissues," IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng., BME-21, pp. 494-495), Klinger (1974, "Heat Transfer in Perfused Tissue I: General Theory," Bull. Math. Biol., 36, pp. 403-415), and Chen and Holmes (1980, "Microvascular Contributions in Tissue Heat Transfer," Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci., 335, pp. 137-150), thermal wave bioheat, dual-phase-lagging (DPL) bioheat, two-energy-equations, blood DPL bioheat, and tissue DPL bioheat models. We analyze the methodologies involved in these two approaches, the used constitutive theories for heat flux density vector and the developed models. The analysis shows the simplicity of the mixture theory approach and the powerful capacity of the porous-media approach for effectively developing accurate macroscale thermal models for biological tissues. Future research is in great demand to materialize the promising potential of the porous-media approach by developing a rigorous closure theory. The heterogeneous and nonisotropic nature of biological tissue yields normally a strong noninstantaneous response between heat flux and temperature gradient in nonequilibrium heat transport. Both blood and tissue macroscale temperatures satisfy the DPL-type energy equations with the same values of the phase lags of heat flux and temperature gradient that can be computed in terms of blood and tissue properties, blood-tissue interfacial convective heat transfer coefficient, and blood perfusion rate. The blood-tissue interaction leads to very sophisticated effect of the interfacial convective heat transfer, the blood velocity, the perfusion, and the metabolic reaction on blood and tissue macroscale temperature fields such as the spreading of tissue metabolic heating effect into the blood DPL bioheat equation and the appearance of the convection term in the tissue DPL bioheat equation due to the blood velocity.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157093
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.723
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.024
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Research Grants Council of Hong KongGRF718009
Funding Information:

The financial support from the Research Grants Council of Hong Kong (Grant GRF718009) is gratefully acknowledged.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWang, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorFan, Jen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:45:18Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:45:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Heat Transfer, 2011, v. 133 n. 1en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-1481en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157093-
dc.description.abstractMacroscale thermal models have been developed for biological tissues either by the mixture theory of continuum mechanics or by the porous-media theory. The former uses scaling-down from the global scale; the latter applies scaling-up from the microscale by the volume averaging. The used constitutive relations for heat flux density vector include the Fourier law, the Cattaneo-Vernotte (Cattaneo, C., 1958, "A Form of Heat Conduction Equation Which Eliminates the Paradox of Instantaneous Propagation," Compt. Rend., 247, pp. 431-433; Vernotte, P., 1958, "Les Paradoxes de la Th́orie Continue de I'equation de la Chaleur," Compt. Rend., 246, pp. 3154-3155) theory, and the dual-phase-lagging theory. The developed models contain, for example, the Pennes (1948, "Analysis of Tissue and Arterial Blood Temperature in the Resting Human Forearm," J. Appl. Physiol., 1, pp. 93-122), Wulff (1974, "The Energy Conservation Equation for Living Tissues," IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng., BME-21, pp. 494-495), Klinger (1974, "Heat Transfer in Perfused Tissue I: General Theory," Bull. Math. Biol., 36, pp. 403-415), and Chen and Holmes (1980, "Microvascular Contributions in Tissue Heat Transfer," Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci., 335, pp. 137-150), thermal wave bioheat, dual-phase-lagging (DPL) bioheat, two-energy-equations, blood DPL bioheat, and tissue DPL bioheat models. We analyze the methodologies involved in these two approaches, the used constitutive theories for heat flux density vector and the developed models. The analysis shows the simplicity of the mixture theory approach and the powerful capacity of the porous-media approach for effectively developing accurate macroscale thermal models for biological tissues. Future research is in great demand to materialize the promising potential of the porous-media approach by developing a rigorous closure theory. The heterogeneous and nonisotropic nature of biological tissue yields normally a strong noninstantaneous response between heat flux and temperature gradient in nonequilibrium heat transport. Both blood and tissue macroscale temperatures satisfy the DPL-type energy equations with the same values of the phase lags of heat flux and temperature gradient that can be computed in terms of blood and tissue properties, blood-tissue interfacial convective heat transfer coefficient, and blood perfusion rate. The blood-tissue interaction leads to very sophisticated effect of the interfacial convective heat transfer, the blood velocity, the perfusion, and the metabolic reaction on blood and tissue macroscale temperature fields such as the spreading of tissue metabolic heating effect into the blood DPL bioheat equation and the appearance of the convection term in the tissue DPL bioheat equation due to the blood velocity.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherA S M E International. The Journal's web site is located at http://ojps.aip.org/ASMEJournals/HeatTransferen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Heat Transferen_US
dc.subjectBioheat Transporten_US
dc.subjectBlood-Tissue Interactionen_US
dc.subjectDual-Phase-Laggingen_US
dc.subjectMacroscaleen_US
dc.subjectMixture Theoryen_US
dc.subjectModelingen_US
dc.subjectPorous-Media Theoryen_US
dc.titleModeling bioheat transport at macroscaleen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWang, L:lqwang@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWang, L=rp00184en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1115/1.4002361en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-78449291225en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-78449291225&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume133en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000282430500011-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, L=35235288500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFan, J=36019048800en_US

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