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Article: A review on biodiesel production using catalyzed transesterification

TitleA review on biodiesel production using catalyzed transesterification
Authors
KeywordsAlkali-catalyzed transesterification
Biodiesel
Feedstock
Mass transfer
Purification
Issue Date2010
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/apenergy
Citation
Applied Energy, 2010, v. 87 n. 4, p. 1083-1095 How to Cite?
AbstractBiodiesel is a low-emissions diesel substitute fuel made from renewable resources and waste lipid. The most common way to produce biodiesel is through transesterification, especially alkali-catalyzed transesterification. When the raw materials (oils or fats) have a high percentage of free fatty acids or water, the alkali catalyst will react with the free fatty acids to form soaps. The water can hydrolyze the triglycerides into diglycerides and form more free fatty acids. Both of the above reactions are undesirable and reduce the yield of the biodiesel product. In this situation, the acidic materials should be pre-treated to inhibit the saponification reaction. This paper reviews the different approaches of reducing free fatty acids in the raw oil and refinement of crude biodiesel that are adopted in the industry. The main factors affecting the yield of biodiesel, i.e. alcohol quantity, reaction time, reaction temperature and catalyst concentration, are discussed. This paper also described other new processes of biodiesel production. For instance, the Biox co-solvent process converts triglycerides to esters through the selection of inert co-solvents that generates a one-phase oil-rich system. The non-catalytic supercritical methanol process is advantageous in terms of shorter reaction time and lesser purification steps but requires high temperature and pressure. For the in situ biodiesel process, the oilseeds are treated directly with methanol in which the catalyst has been preciously dissolved at ambient temperatures and pressure to perform the transesterification of oils in the oilseeds. This process, however, cannot handle waste cooking oils and animal fats. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157042
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.746
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.998
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeung, DYCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWu, Xen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, MKHen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:45:04Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:45:04Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationApplied Energy, 2010, v. 87 n. 4, p. 1083-1095en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0306-2619en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157042-
dc.description.abstractBiodiesel is a low-emissions diesel substitute fuel made from renewable resources and waste lipid. The most common way to produce biodiesel is through transesterification, especially alkali-catalyzed transesterification. When the raw materials (oils or fats) have a high percentage of free fatty acids or water, the alkali catalyst will react with the free fatty acids to form soaps. The water can hydrolyze the triglycerides into diglycerides and form more free fatty acids. Both of the above reactions are undesirable and reduce the yield of the biodiesel product. In this situation, the acidic materials should be pre-treated to inhibit the saponification reaction. This paper reviews the different approaches of reducing free fatty acids in the raw oil and refinement of crude biodiesel that are adopted in the industry. The main factors affecting the yield of biodiesel, i.e. alcohol quantity, reaction time, reaction temperature and catalyst concentration, are discussed. This paper also described other new processes of biodiesel production. For instance, the Biox co-solvent process converts triglycerides to esters through the selection of inert co-solvents that generates a one-phase oil-rich system. The non-catalytic supercritical methanol process is advantageous in terms of shorter reaction time and lesser purification steps but requires high temperature and pressure. For the in situ biodiesel process, the oilseeds are treated directly with methanol in which the catalyst has been preciously dissolved at ambient temperatures and pressure to perform the transesterification of oils in the oilseeds. This process, however, cannot handle waste cooking oils and animal fats. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/apenergyen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofApplied Energyen_HK
dc.subjectAlkali-catalyzed transesterificationen_HK
dc.subjectBiodieselen_HK
dc.subjectFeedstocken_HK
dc.subjectMass transferen_HK
dc.subjectPurificationen_HK
dc.titleA review on biodiesel production using catalyzed transesterificationen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, DYC: ycleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, MKH:en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, DYC=rp00149en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, MKH=rp00148en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.apenergy.2009.10.006en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-73149123783en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros171127-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-73149123783&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume87en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1083en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1095en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1872-9118-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000274506500002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, DYC=7203002484en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWu, X=9241118600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, MKH=8862966600en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike6197066-

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