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Article: Poly(ethylene terephthalate)/polypropylene microfibrillar composites. III. Structural development of poly(ethylene terephthalate) microfibers

TitlePoly(ethylene terephthalate)/polypropylene microfibrillar composites. III. Structural development of poly(ethylene terephthalate) microfibers
Authors
KeywordsAnnealing
Blends
Drawing
Molecular Dynamics
Issue Date2007
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/0021-8995/
Citation
Journal Of Applied Polymer Science, 2007, v. 104 n. 1, p. 137-146 How to Cite?
AbstractPoly(ethylene terephthalate) was extruded, solid-state-drawn, and annealed to simulate the structure of poly(ethylene terephthalate) microfibers in a poly(ethylene terephthalate)/polypropylene blend. Differential scanning calorimetry and wide-angle X-ray scattering analyses were conducted to study the structural development of the poly(ethylene terephthalate) extrudates at different processing stages. The as-extruded extrudate had a low crystallinity (∼ 10%) and a generally random texture. After cold drawing, the extrudate exhibited a strong molecular alignment along the drawing direction, and there was a crystallinity gain of about 25% that was generally independent of the strain rates used (0.0167-1.67 s-1). 26 scans showed that the strain-induced crystals were less distinctive than those from melt crystallization. During drawing above the glass-transition temperature, the structural development was more dependent on the strain rate. At low strain rates, the extrudate was in a state of flow drawing. The resultant crystallinity hardly changed, and the texture remained generally random. At high strain rates, strain-induced crystallization occurred, and the crystallinity gain was similar to that in cold drawing. Thermally agitated short-range diffusion of the oriented crystalline molecules was possible, and the resultant crystal structure became more comparable to that from melt crystallization. Annealing around 200°C further increased the crystallinity of the drawn extrudates but had little effect on the texture. © 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/156883
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.866
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.578
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeung, FKPen_US
dc.contributor.authorCheung, WLen_US
dc.contributor.authorLin, XDen_US
dc.contributor.authorJia, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorChung, CYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:44:24Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:44:24Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Applied Polymer Science, 2007, v. 104 n. 1, p. 137-146en_US
dc.identifier.issn0021-8995en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/156883-
dc.description.abstractPoly(ethylene terephthalate) was extruded, solid-state-drawn, and annealed to simulate the structure of poly(ethylene terephthalate) microfibers in a poly(ethylene terephthalate)/polypropylene blend. Differential scanning calorimetry and wide-angle X-ray scattering analyses were conducted to study the structural development of the poly(ethylene terephthalate) extrudates at different processing stages. The as-extruded extrudate had a low crystallinity (∼ 10%) and a generally random texture. After cold drawing, the extrudate exhibited a strong molecular alignment along the drawing direction, and there was a crystallinity gain of about 25% that was generally independent of the strain rates used (0.0167-1.67 s-1). 26 scans showed that the strain-induced crystals were less distinctive than those from melt crystallization. During drawing above the glass-transition temperature, the structural development was more dependent on the strain rate. At low strain rates, the extrudate was in a state of flow drawing. The resultant crystallinity hardly changed, and the texture remained generally random. At high strain rates, strain-induced crystallization occurred, and the crystallinity gain was similar to that in cold drawing. Thermally agitated short-range diffusion of the oriented crystalline molecules was possible, and the resultant crystal structure became more comparable to that from melt crystallization. Annealing around 200°C further increased the crystallinity of the drawn extrudates but had little effect on the texture. © 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/0021-8995/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Applied Polymer Scienceen_US
dc.rightsJournal of Applied Polymer Science. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons, Inc.-
dc.subjectAnnealingen_US
dc.subjectBlendsen_US
dc.subjectDrawingen_US
dc.subjectMolecular Dynamicsen_US
dc.titlePoly(ethylene terephthalate)/polypropylene microfibrillar composites. III. Structural development of poly(ethylene terephthalate) microfibersen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailCheung, WL:wlcheung@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, WL=rp00103en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/app.24750en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33947244402en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros132269-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33947244402&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume104en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage137en_US
dc.identifier.epage146en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000244375100020-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, FKP=36103829300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, WL=7202743084en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLin, XD=36768282100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJia, D=7101755520en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChung, CY=8100842800en_US

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