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Article: Hydraulics of a submerged weir and applicability in navigational channels: basic flow structures

TitleHydraulics of a submerged weir and applicability in navigational channels: basic flow structures
Authors
KeywordsFlow Structure
Numerical Modelling
Physical Model
River Bends
Submerged Weir
Issue Date2007
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/1430
Citation
International Journal for Numerical Methods in Engineering, 2007, v. 69 n. 11, p. 2264-2278 How to Cite?
AbstractThis paper presents the basic flow structures in a river bend in a physical model with and without a submerged weir. The CCHE2D model and the CCHE3D model for free surface and turbulent flows, which have been extensively validated and verified in recent years, are combined to study the flow in the channel in both the presence and absence of a submerged weir, where the water surface elevations and velocities are measured for certain flow conditions and in certain ranges. A 2D model is used to determine the water edge and to calibrate the bed roughness for the 3D model. A 3D model, after calibration and validation with the physical model data, is used to investigate the flow structure in the channel both in the presence and absence of a submerged weir. The agreement between the measured velocities (surface elevations) and the simulated velocities is reasonably good, which indicates that the CCHE3D model is capable of investigating the flow structure of such a channel. It is found that the submerged weir has a significant effect on the flow in the channel, and that the largest influence appears in the vicinity of the weir. Secondary flows, which are key to navigational conditions, undergo a process of break up when the flow approaches the weir, and develop into single, two, and three secondary flow zones downstream of the weir and then decay from three to two secondary flow zones and finally revert to a single secondary flow zone. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/156882
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.1
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.007
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHuang, SLen_US
dc.contributor.authorNg, COen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:44:24Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:44:24Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal for Numerical Methods in Engineering, 2007, v. 69 n. 11, p. 2264-2278en_US
dc.identifier.issn0029-5981en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/156882-
dc.description.abstractThis paper presents the basic flow structures in a river bend in a physical model with and without a submerged weir. The CCHE2D model and the CCHE3D model for free surface and turbulent flows, which have been extensively validated and verified in recent years, are combined to study the flow in the channel in both the presence and absence of a submerged weir, where the water surface elevations and velocities are measured for certain flow conditions and in certain ranges. A 2D model is used to determine the water edge and to calibrate the bed roughness for the 3D model. A 3D model, after calibration and validation with the physical model data, is used to investigate the flow structure in the channel both in the presence and absence of a submerged weir. The agreement between the measured velocities (surface elevations) and the simulated velocities is reasonably good, which indicates that the CCHE3D model is capable of investigating the flow structure of such a channel. It is found that the submerged weir has a significant effect on the flow in the channel, and that the largest influence appears in the vicinity of the weir. Secondary flows, which are key to navigational conditions, undergo a process of break up when the flow approaches the weir, and develop into single, two, and three secondary flow zones downstream of the weir and then decay from three to two secondary flow zones and finally revert to a single secondary flow zone. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/1430en_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal for Numerical Methods in Engineeringen_US
dc.rightsInternational Journal for Numerical Methods in Engineering. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons Ltd.-
dc.subjectFlow Structureen_US
dc.subjectNumerical Modellingen_US
dc.subjectPhysical Modelen_US
dc.subjectRiver Bendsen_US
dc.subjectSubmerged Weiren_US
dc.titleHydraulics of a submerged weir and applicability in navigational channels: basic flow structuresen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHuang, S: sui_liang_huang@hotmail.comen_US
dc.identifier.emailNg, CO: cong@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityNg, CO=rp00224en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/nme.1849en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33947222081en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros126274-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33947222081&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume69en_US
dc.identifier.issue11en_US
dc.identifier.spage2264en_US
dc.identifier.epage2278en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000244915100003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHuang, SL=24437506400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNg, CO=7401705594en_US

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