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Article: Thermal mass design in buildings - Heavy or light?

TitleThermal mass design in buildings - Heavy or light?
Authors
KeywordsDesign Method
Heat Storage
Natural Ventilation
Night Ventilation
Passive Cooling
Thermal Mass
Thermal Time Constant
Issue Date2006
PublisherVEETECH Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ijovent.org/
Citation
International Journal Of Ventilation, 2006, v. 5 n. 1, p. 143-149 How to Cite?
AbstractThermal mass, including the building envelope, the interior partition, the furnishing, or even the air inside a building, is defined as the mass that can store thermal energy (heat or cooling energy). For storing heat in buildings, there are two important thermal properties of the materials that need to be considered, i.e. the heat capacity by volume and the heat-absorption rate. The first property determines the ability of the element to store thermal energy, and the second property determines the ability of the element to conduct the thermal energy. The combined convective and radiative heat transfer coefficient and the surface area of the thermal mass determine the rate of heat transfer between the thermal mass element and the air. One of the good examples in using thermal mass is night cooling, which can avoid or minimize the need for mechanical cooling in buildings. We present a simple design formula for use by architects and engineers which involves only three design related parameters, i.e. the time constant of the system, the dimensionless convective heat transfer number and the Fourier time constant. The present method allows the fast determination of the amount of thermal mass as well as key design parameters when the phase shift of indoor air temperature and the attenuation of the indoor air temperature fluctuation are specified.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/156844
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.662
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.474
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorXu, Pen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:44:13Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:44:13Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Ventilation, 2006, v. 5 n. 1, p. 143-149en_US
dc.identifier.issn1473-3315en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/156844-
dc.description.abstractThermal mass, including the building envelope, the interior partition, the furnishing, or even the air inside a building, is defined as the mass that can store thermal energy (heat or cooling energy). For storing heat in buildings, there are two important thermal properties of the materials that need to be considered, i.e. the heat capacity by volume and the heat-absorption rate. The first property determines the ability of the element to store thermal energy, and the second property determines the ability of the element to conduct the thermal energy. The combined convective and radiative heat transfer coefficient and the surface area of the thermal mass determine the rate of heat transfer between the thermal mass element and the air. One of the good examples in using thermal mass is night cooling, which can avoid or minimize the need for mechanical cooling in buildings. We present a simple design formula for use by architects and engineers which involves only three design related parameters, i.e. the time constant of the system, the dimensionless convective heat transfer number and the Fourier time constant. The present method allows the fast determination of the amount of thermal mass as well as key design parameters when the phase shift of indoor air temperature and the attenuation of the indoor air temperature fluctuation are specified.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherVEETECH Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ijovent.org/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Ventilationen_US
dc.subjectDesign Methoden_US
dc.subjectHeat Storageen_US
dc.subjectNatural Ventilationen_US
dc.subjectNight Ventilationen_US
dc.subjectPassive Coolingen_US
dc.subjectThermal Massen_US
dc.subjectThermal Time Constanten_US
dc.titleThermal mass design in buildings - Heavy or light?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLi, Y:liyg@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLi, Y=rp00151en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33748785964en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33748785964&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume5en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage143en_US
dc.identifier.epage149en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, Y=7502094052en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXu, P=8440784800en_US

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