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Article: Achieving natural and hybrid ventilation in practice
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TitleAchieving natural and hybrid ventilation in practice
 
AuthorsLiddament, M5
Axley, J2
Heiselberg, P4
Li, Y1
Stathopoulos, T3
 
KeywordsCase Studies
Existing Buildings
Hybrid Ventilation
Mixed Mode Ventilation
Natural Ventilation
New Buildings
Passive Cooling
Ventilation Problems
 
Issue Date2006
 
PublisherVEETECH Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ijovent.org/
 
CitationInternational Journal of Ventilation, 2006, v. 5 n. 1, p. 115-130 [How to Cite?]
 
AbstractCase studies provide essential evidence about the performance of buildings. They also illustrate the methods by which a technology can be implemented as well as highlighting problems. Various case study buildings (both new and retrofit) that incorporate mixed mode, natural ventilation and low energy cooling are reviewed in this paper. An outline of the tasks that ventilation is required to perform is also presented. The results show that many buildings perform well and can provide good thermal comfort and air quality for much of the occupied period. Various solutions have been introduced to extend the range and climate in which such buildings can operate. These include pre conditioning the air using underground labyrinths or buried pipes, the inclusion of pre-heating and cooling coils, and the use of thermal mass combined with night cooling. Design and operational faults include incorrect assumptions about heat gains, the failure of components, inaccessible components, structural failures and problems with outdoor air quality. These aspects are described in more detail in the paper.
 
ISSN1473-3315
2013 Impact Factor: 0.303
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.225
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLiddament, M
 
dc.contributor.authorAxley, J
 
dc.contributor.authorHeiselberg, P
 
dc.contributor.authorLi, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorStathopoulos, T
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:44:13Z
 
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:44:13Z
 
dc.date.issued2006
 
dc.description.abstractCase studies provide essential evidence about the performance of buildings. They also illustrate the methods by which a technology can be implemented as well as highlighting problems. Various case study buildings (both new and retrofit) that incorporate mixed mode, natural ventilation and low energy cooling are reviewed in this paper. An outline of the tasks that ventilation is required to perform is also presented. The results show that many buildings perform well and can provide good thermal comfort and air quality for much of the occupied period. Various solutions have been introduced to extend the range and climate in which such buildings can operate. These include pre conditioning the air using underground labyrinths or buried pipes, the inclusion of pre-heating and cooling coils, and the use of thermal mass combined with night cooling. Design and operational faults include incorrect assumptions about heat gains, the failure of components, inaccessible components, structural failures and problems with outdoor air quality. These aspects are described in more detail in the paper.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Ventilation, 2006, v. 5 n. 1, p. 115-130 [How to Cite?]
 
dc.identifier.epage130
 
dc.identifier.hkuros118278
 
dc.identifier.issn1473-3315
2013 Impact Factor: 0.303
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.225
 
dc.identifier.issue1
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33748762988
 
dc.identifier.spage115
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/156843
 
dc.identifier.volume5
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherVEETECH Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ijovent.org/
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Ventilation
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subjectCase Studies
 
dc.subjectExisting Buildings
 
dc.subjectHybrid Ventilation
 
dc.subjectMixed Mode Ventilation
 
dc.subjectNatural Ventilation
 
dc.subjectNew Buildings
 
dc.subjectPassive Cooling
 
dc.subjectVentilation Problems
 
dc.titleAchieving natural and hybrid ventilation in practice
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Heiselberg, P</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Li, Y</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Stathopoulos, T</contributor.author>
<date.accessioned>2012-08-08T08:44:13Z</date.accessioned>
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<subject>Case Studies</subject>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Yale University
  3. Universite Concordia
  4. Aalborg Universitet
  5. VEETECH Ltd.