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Article: Neuromechanical interaction in human snoring and upper airway obstruction

TitleNeuromechanical interaction in human snoring and upper airway obstruction
Authors
Issue Date1999
Citation
Journal Of Applied Physiology, 1999, v. 86 n. 6, p. 1759-1763 How to Cite?
AbstractThe fact that snoring and obstructive apnea only occur during sleep means that effective neuromuscular functioning of the upper airway during sleep is vital for the maintenance of unimpeded breathing. Recent clinical studies in humans have obtained evidence demonstrating that upper airway neural receptors sense the negative pressure generated by inspiration and 'trigger,' with a certain delay, reflex muscle activation to sustain the airway that might otherwise collapse. These findings have enabled us to propose a model in which the mechanics is coupled to the neuromuscular physiology through the generation of reflex wall stiffening proportional to the retarded fluid pressure. Preliminary results on this model exhibit three kinds of behavior typical of unimpeded breathing, snoring, and obstructive sleep apnea, respectively. We suggest that the increased latency of the reflex muscle activation in sleep, together with the reduced strength of the reflex, have important clinical consequences.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/156695
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.004
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.488
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorFfowcs Williams, JEen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:43:34Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:43:34Z-
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Applied Physiology, 1999, v. 86 n. 6, p. 1759-1763en_US
dc.identifier.issn8750-7587en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/156695-
dc.description.abstractThe fact that snoring and obstructive apnea only occur during sleep means that effective neuromuscular functioning of the upper airway during sleep is vital for the maintenance of unimpeded breathing. Recent clinical studies in humans have obtained evidence demonstrating that upper airway neural receptors sense the negative pressure generated by inspiration and 'trigger,' with a certain delay, reflex muscle activation to sustain the airway that might otherwise collapse. These findings have enabled us to propose a model in which the mechanics is coupled to the neuromuscular physiology through the generation of reflex wall stiffening proportional to the retarded fluid pressure. Preliminary results on this model exhibit three kinds of behavior typical of unimpeded breathing, snoring, and obstructive sleep apnea, respectively. We suggest that the increased latency of the reflex muscle activation in sleep, together with the reduced strength of the reflex, have important clinical consequences.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Applied Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAirway Obstruction - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAlgorithmsen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshModels, Biologicalen_US
dc.subject.meshReflex - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshRespiratory Mechanics - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshRespiratory System - Innervation - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshSleep Apnea Syndromes - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshSnoring - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.titleNeuromechanical interaction in human snoring and upper airway obstructionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHuang, L:lixi@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHuang, L=rp00119en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid10368334-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0344224198en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0344224198&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume86en_US
dc.identifier.issue6en_US
dc.identifier.spage1759en_US
dc.identifier.epage1763en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000080781400006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHuang, L=7404735514en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFfowcs Williams, JE=7004263923en_US

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