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Article: Enhancement of porcine skin graft adherence using a light-activated process

TitleEnhancement of porcine skin graft adherence using a light-activated process
Authors
Issue Date2002
PublisherElsevier Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jsre
Citation
Journal Of Surgical Research, 2002, v. 108 n. 1, p. 77-84 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground. Skin grafts are widely used in plastic surgery, and burn and ulcer wound management. Rapid and sustained adherence, the ability to resist shear stress, and a void-free surface-to-surface contact are critical to the success of graft survival. Mechanical and adhesive fixation aids are currently used to achieve graft adherence and they are not free of problems. Photochemical tissue bonding (PTB) is an emerging laser technique with numerous applications in surgical specialties. In the current study, PTB was investigated as a means to bond and enhance the adherence of skin grafts. Methods. In this study, ex vivo porcine skin grafts treated with a photosensitizing dye, rose bengal (RB), were approximated dermis-to-dermis and irradiated with visible light from an argon laser at 514 nm. The adherence of the skin grafts was measured immediately after irradiation. Dose-response relationships between the light and the dye with adherence of the grafts were established. The surface temperature of the skin under irradiation was monitored and the viability of the skin cells in the grafts was also measured. Results. Results showed that the skin graft adherence was RB dose-dependent in a statistically significant manner with the concentration of RB reaching a plateau value of 0.1% (w/v) of RB. Graft adhesion also increased with laser fluence up to 504 J/cm2 in the presence of 0.1% RB. No fluence dependence was observed in the absence of RB. Thermogram results showed that the maximal surface temperature during irradiation was less than 40°C. Histological investigation and trypan blue exclusion assays demonstrated that skin grafts retained cell viability and collagen organization after PTB. Conclusion. This ex vivo study demonstrates that PTB using argon laser irradiation and RB enhances skin graft adherence by forming dermal-dermal bonding. The increase in adherence is a function of the concentration of RB and the laser fluence. The results also suggest that the PTB is a potentially safe procedure because it is nonthermal in nature and does not significantly affect the skin cell viability. © 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/156626
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.198
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.928
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, BPen_US
dc.contributor.authorKochevar, IEen_US
dc.contributor.authorRedmond, RWen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:43:16Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:43:16Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Surgical Research, 2002, v. 108 n. 1, p. 77-84en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-4804en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/156626-
dc.description.abstractBackground. Skin grafts are widely used in plastic surgery, and burn and ulcer wound management. Rapid and sustained adherence, the ability to resist shear stress, and a void-free surface-to-surface contact are critical to the success of graft survival. Mechanical and adhesive fixation aids are currently used to achieve graft adherence and they are not free of problems. Photochemical tissue bonding (PTB) is an emerging laser technique with numerous applications in surgical specialties. In the current study, PTB was investigated as a means to bond and enhance the adherence of skin grafts. Methods. In this study, ex vivo porcine skin grafts treated with a photosensitizing dye, rose bengal (RB), were approximated dermis-to-dermis and irradiated with visible light from an argon laser at 514 nm. The adherence of the skin grafts was measured immediately after irradiation. Dose-response relationships between the light and the dye with adherence of the grafts were established. The surface temperature of the skin under irradiation was monitored and the viability of the skin cells in the grafts was also measured. Results. Results showed that the skin graft adherence was RB dose-dependent in a statistically significant manner with the concentration of RB reaching a plateau value of 0.1% (w/v) of RB. Graft adhesion also increased with laser fluence up to 504 J/cm2 in the presence of 0.1% RB. No fluence dependence was observed in the absence of RB. Thermogram results showed that the maximal surface temperature during irradiation was less than 40°C. Histological investigation and trypan blue exclusion assays demonstrated that skin grafts retained cell viability and collagen organization after PTB. Conclusion. This ex vivo study demonstrates that PTB using argon laser irradiation and RB enhances skin graft adherence by forming dermal-dermal bonding. The increase in adherence is a function of the concentration of RB and the laser fluence. The results also suggest that the PTB is a potentially safe procedure because it is nonthermal in nature and does not significantly affect the skin cell viability. © 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jsreen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Surgical Researchen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshArgonen_US
dc.subject.meshCell Survival - Radiation Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshDermis - Cytology - Transplantationen_US
dc.subject.meshFluorescent Dyesen_US
dc.subject.meshLasersen_US
dc.subject.meshPhotochemotherapyen_US
dc.subject.meshRose Bengalen_US
dc.subject.meshSkin Temperature - Radiation Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshSkin Transplantation - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshSwine, Miniatureen_US
dc.subject.meshTissue Adhesionsen_US
dc.titleEnhancement of porcine skin graft adherence using a light-activated processen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, BP:bpchan@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChan, BP=rp00087en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1006/jsre.2002.6516en_US
dc.identifier.pmid12443718en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036440485en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0036440485&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume108en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage77en_US
dc.identifier.epage84en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000179528000011-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, BP=7201530390en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKochevar, IE=35560618300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRedmond, RW=7005328208en_US

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