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Article: Biomimetic mineralisation on plasma sprayed apatite particles and coatings in different simulated physiological fluids

TitleBiomimetic mineralisation on plasma sprayed apatite particles and coatings in different simulated physiological fluids
Authors
Issue Date2001
PublisherTrans Tech Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.scientific.net
Citation
Key Engineering Materials, 2001, v. 192-195, p. 299-302 How to Cite?
AbstractIn vitro mineralisation experiments in simulated physiological fluids (SPFs) are designed to mimic the in vivo mineralisation process and hence can provide vital information during materials development. There is no doubt that intrinsic properties of a material play an important role in the mineralisation process. The commonly used plasma spray technique for depositing bioceramic coatings induces changes in the structure of sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) and hence its biological performance. Although fluorapatite (FA) has a similar crystallographic structure to that of HA, it is more stable during the plasma spray process. In this investigation, plasma spray was employed to produce HA or FA coatings and HA particles with controlled crystallinity. Post-spray heat treatment was performed to increase the crystallinity of HA coatings. These coatings and particles were immersed in different SPFs to investigate in vitro biomimetic mineralisation processes on their surfaces. It was shown that materials having the apatite structure were important for inducing the formation of calcium phosphate mineral but could display different in vitro performances as they contain different amounts of the amorphous phase. The mineralisation process proceeded differently in different SPFs with different ion concentrations.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/156584
ISSN
2005 Impact Factor: 0.224
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.173
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWeng, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, XDen_US
dc.contributor.authorDe Groot, Ken_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:43:04Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:43:04Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.identifier.citationKey Engineering Materials, 2001, v. 192-195, p. 299-302en_US
dc.identifier.issn1013-9826en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/156584-
dc.description.abstractIn vitro mineralisation experiments in simulated physiological fluids (SPFs) are designed to mimic the in vivo mineralisation process and hence can provide vital information during materials development. There is no doubt that intrinsic properties of a material play an important role in the mineralisation process. The commonly used plasma spray technique for depositing bioceramic coatings induces changes in the structure of sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) and hence its biological performance. Although fluorapatite (FA) has a similar crystallographic structure to that of HA, it is more stable during the plasma spray process. In this investigation, plasma spray was employed to produce HA or FA coatings and HA particles with controlled crystallinity. Post-spray heat treatment was performed to increase the crystallinity of HA coatings. These coatings and particles were immersed in different SPFs to investigate in vitro biomimetic mineralisation processes on their surfaces. It was shown that materials having the apatite structure were important for inducing the formation of calcium phosphate mineral but could display different in vitro performances as they contain different amounts of the amorphous phase. The mineralisation process proceeded differently in different SPFs with different ion concentrations.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherTrans Tech Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.scientific.neten_US
dc.relation.ispartofKey Engineering Materialsen_US
dc.titleBiomimetic mineralisation on plasma sprayed apatite particles and coatings in different simulated physiological fluidsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWang, M:memwang@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWang, M=rp00185en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0035155398en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0035155398&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume192-195en_US
dc.identifier.spage299en_US
dc.identifier.epage302en_US
dc.publisher.placeSwitzerlanden_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWeng, J=7202292060en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, M=15749714100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, XD=7410272078en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDe Groot, K=7102842701en_US

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