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Article: Reversal of the Bernoulli effect and channel flutter

TitleReversal of the Bernoulli effect and channel flutter
Authors
Issue Date1998
PublisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jfs
Citation
Journal Of Fluids And Structures, 1998, v. 12 n. 2, p. 131-151 How to Cite?
AbstractThis paper is concerned with the collapse and subsequent self-excited oscillation of compliant tubes conveying fluids. Our model considers a two-dimensional, in viscid, shear flow in a flexible channel of infinite length subject to linear, travelling varicose waves. Analysis of the boundary-value problem leads to two findings which do not seem to have been noticed before, despite the close attention this kind of fluid-structure interaction has attracted on account of its medical significance. The pressure perturbation on the wall has two components, the first is in-phase with the wall displacement and the second with the velocity of the wall motion. For potential flow, the first component is the only one tending to destabilize and is known as the Bernoulli effect. For shear flow, however, the sign of the pressure is reversed as the Bernoulli effect is overcome by the perturbations of the vorticity field. Streamline patterns show that Kelvin's "cats' eyes" are sheltered in the wider channel sections, rendering the effective flow passage smaller where the physical width is larger. The second component produces a wave drag, hence irreversible transfer of energy from the flow to waves. We argue that this is a possible mechanism for the self-excited oscillation observed in experiments. This mechanism is similar to Miles's (1957) mechanism of water wave generation by wind, which is a class B instability according to the Benjamin-Landahl categorization, but the accompanying reversal of the Bernoulli effect is different and depends essentially on the presence of a second boundary. The eigenvalue problem is also considered and it is shown that dynamic instability of long but finite wavelength could be experienced by compliant channels with thick walls, a typical application being the respiratory flow in the upper airways. The critical flow speed is given in terms of the channel properties. © 1998 Academic Press Limited.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/156294
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.709
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.282
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Len_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:41:51Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:41:51Z-
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Fluids And Structures, 1998, v. 12 n. 2, p. 131-151en_US
dc.identifier.issn0889-9746en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/156294-
dc.description.abstractThis paper is concerned with the collapse and subsequent self-excited oscillation of compliant tubes conveying fluids. Our model considers a two-dimensional, in viscid, shear flow in a flexible channel of infinite length subject to linear, travelling varicose waves. Analysis of the boundary-value problem leads to two findings which do not seem to have been noticed before, despite the close attention this kind of fluid-structure interaction has attracted on account of its medical significance. The pressure perturbation on the wall has two components, the first is in-phase with the wall displacement and the second with the velocity of the wall motion. For potential flow, the first component is the only one tending to destabilize and is known as the Bernoulli effect. For shear flow, however, the sign of the pressure is reversed as the Bernoulli effect is overcome by the perturbations of the vorticity field. Streamline patterns show that Kelvin's "cats' eyes" are sheltered in the wider channel sections, rendering the effective flow passage smaller where the physical width is larger. The second component produces a wave drag, hence irreversible transfer of energy from the flow to waves. We argue that this is a possible mechanism for the self-excited oscillation observed in experiments. This mechanism is similar to Miles's (1957) mechanism of water wave generation by wind, which is a class B instability according to the Benjamin-Landahl categorization, but the accompanying reversal of the Bernoulli effect is different and depends essentially on the presence of a second boundary. The eigenvalue problem is also considered and it is shown that dynamic instability of long but finite wavelength could be experienced by compliant channels with thick walls, a typical application being the respiratory flow in the upper airways. The critical flow speed is given in terms of the channel properties. © 1998 Academic Press Limited.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jfsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Fluids and Structuresen_US
dc.titleReversal of the Bernoulli effect and channel flutteren_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHuang, L:lixi@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHuang, L=rp00119en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0000366822en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0000366822&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume12en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage131en_US
dc.identifier.epage151en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHuang, L=7404735514en_US

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