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Article: "There are many ways to translate it": Existential constructions in English-Chinese translation

Title"There are many ways to translate it": Existential constructions in English-Chinese translation
Authors
KeywordsChinese/English
Dummy Pronoun There
Existential Construction
Parallel Corpus
Translations
Issue Date2010
Citation
Languages In Contrast, 2010, v. 10 n. 1, p. 29-53 How to Cite?
AbstractThe study is motivated by Mona Baker's (1992) observation that it is almost impossible to find a grammatical category which can be expressed uniformly and regularly across languages. The aim of the present study is to verify Baker's claim by investigating existential sentences from an English-Chinese contrastive perspective. The data was taken from the Babel English-Chinese Parallel Corpus, which is part-of-speech tagged and aligned at sentence level. Variation in the verbs used in English and Chinese existential clauses is discussed, and patterns of notional subjects (i.e. the noun phrase following the existential verb) and how they are translated are considered. The paper also looks into the applicability of Halliday's theme-rheme approach to studying Chinese existentials and proposes that the topic-prominence analysis offers a more cogent account for the findings reported here. © John Benjamins Publishing Company.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/156026
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.312
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, MLYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:39:51Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:39:51Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationLanguages In Contrast, 2010, v. 10 n. 1, p. 29-53en_US
dc.identifier.issn1387-6759en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/156026-
dc.description.abstractThe study is motivated by Mona Baker's (1992) observation that it is almost impossible to find a grammatical category which can be expressed uniformly and regularly across languages. The aim of the present study is to verify Baker's claim by investigating existential sentences from an English-Chinese contrastive perspective. The data was taken from the Babel English-Chinese Parallel Corpus, which is part-of-speech tagged and aligned at sentence level. Variation in the verbs used in English and Chinese existential clauses is discussed, and patterns of notional subjects (i.e. the noun phrase following the existential verb) and how they are translated are considered. The paper also looks into the applicability of Halliday's theme-rheme approach to studying Chinese existentials and proposes that the topic-prominence analysis offers a more cogent account for the findings reported here. © John Benjamins Publishing Company.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofLanguages in Contrasten_US
dc.subjectChinese/Englishen_US
dc.subjectDummy Pronoun Thereen_US
dc.subjectExistential Constructionen_US
dc.subjectParallel Corpusen_US
dc.subjectTranslationsen_US
dc.title"There are many ways to translate it": Existential constructions in English-Chinese translationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, MLY:wlymay@yahoo.comen_US
dc.identifier.authorityWong, MLY=rp01209en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1075/lic.10.1.02wonen_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77954735666en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77954735666&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume10en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage29en_US
dc.identifier.epage53en_US
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, MLY=26436208100en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike7067643-

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