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Article: Ethnic identity, participation and social justice: A constitution for new Nepal?

TitleEthnic identity, participation and social justice: A constitution for new Nepal?
Authors
KeywordsConstitution Making
Ethnicity
Political Inclusion
Restructuring Of State
Social Justice
Issue Date2011
PublisherMartinus Nijhoff. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.brill.nl/m_catalogue_sub6_id18203.htm
Citation
International Journal On Minority And Group Rights, 2011, v. 18 n. 3, p. 309-334 How to Cite?
AbstractFor nearly two centuries Nepal has been governed under the hegemony of three upper caste communities: Brahmins, Chettries and Newars. Under the influence of Hinduism and the monarchy, other communities, Dalits, women, indigenous peoples and the people of the southern parts were marginalised. Struggles of democracy in the 1950s were less about social justice than the access of the elite communities to increasing shares in the spoils and administration of the state, which was achieved in the 1990 Constitution. The Maoist rebellion in the mid 1990s seriously hampered the working of the Constitution, although not the hegemony of the upper caste communities. The uprising of the people against the King in April 2006 changed the context of that rebellion, accelerated the ceasefire and introduced a new constitutional agenda, based on social justice and the inclusion of the marginalised community in the affairs and institutions of the state. However, despite the overthrow of the monarchy, a multi-party government, of parties committed to fundamental state restructuring, progress towards a new dispensation has been slow. A new Constitution should have been adopted by April 2010 by an elected, representative Constituent Assembly but disagreements between the former elites, still firmly in control of politics, has diverted attention from constitutional reform. © 2011 Martinus Nijhoff Publishers.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/156011
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.119
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGhai, Yen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:39:29Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:39:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal On Minority And Group Rights, 2011, v. 18 n. 3, p. 309-334en_US
dc.identifier.issn1385-4879en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/156011-
dc.description.abstractFor nearly two centuries Nepal has been governed under the hegemony of three upper caste communities: Brahmins, Chettries and Newars. Under the influence of Hinduism and the monarchy, other communities, Dalits, women, indigenous peoples and the people of the southern parts were marginalised. Struggles of democracy in the 1950s were less about social justice than the access of the elite communities to increasing shares in the spoils and administration of the state, which was achieved in the 1990 Constitution. The Maoist rebellion in the mid 1990s seriously hampered the working of the Constitution, although not the hegemony of the upper caste communities. The uprising of the people against the King in April 2006 changed the context of that rebellion, accelerated the ceasefire and introduced a new constitutional agenda, based on social justice and the inclusion of the marginalised community in the affairs and institutions of the state. However, despite the overthrow of the monarchy, a multi-party government, of parties committed to fundamental state restructuring, progress towards a new dispensation has been slow. A new Constitution should have been adopted by April 2010 by an elected, representative Constituent Assembly but disagreements between the former elites, still firmly in control of politics, has diverted attention from constitutional reform. © 2011 Martinus Nijhoff Publishers.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherMartinus Nijhoff. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.brill.nl/m_catalogue_sub6_id18203.htmen_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal on Minority and Group Rightsen_US
dc.subjectConstitution Makingen_US
dc.subjectEthnicityen_US
dc.subjectPolitical Inclusionen_US
dc.subjectRestructuring Of Stateen_US
dc.subjectSocial Justiceen_US
dc.titleEthnic identity, participation and social justice: A constitution for new Nepal?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailGhai, Y:ypghai@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityGhai, Y=rp01483en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1163/157181111X583305en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80053021881en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-80053021881&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume18en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage309en_US
dc.identifier.epage334en_US
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGhai, Y=6602392504en_US

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