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Article: China Internet going wild: Cyber-hunting versus privacy protection

TitleChina Internet going wild: Cyber-hunting versus privacy protection
Authors
KeywordsChina
Cyber Lynching
Cyber-Manhunt
Human Flesh Search Engine
Internet
Isp
Privacy
Issue Date2009
PublisherElsevier Advanced Technology. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/422550/description?navopenmenu=-2
Citation
Computer Law and Security Review, 2009, v. 25 n. 3, p. 275-279 How to Cite?
AbstractThe Internet is notoriously known to be the "human flesh search engine" in China when it is used against private individuals for the purpose of social shaming, monitoring and revenge. In such case of cyber witch hunting, personal information of the targeted individuals is often ruthlessly exposed and their lives are mercilessly disrupted. In the face of the growing resort to the human flesh search engine, the Beijing Court delivered the first ruling condemning this practice and affirming privacy rights for Chinese citizens at the end of 2008. This article discusses the trend of cyber-manhunt in China, with specific focus on the judgment of the Beijing Court. It points out the inadequacy in the ruling and argues that legislative enactment to protect personal information at the national level is essential in China. © 2009 Anne S. Y. Cheung.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/155996
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.373
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.382

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheung, ASYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:39:23Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:39:23Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.citationComputer Law and Security Review, 2009, v. 25 n. 3, p. 275-279en_US
dc.identifier.issn0267-3649en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/155996-
dc.description.abstractThe Internet is notoriously known to be the "human flesh search engine" in China when it is used against private individuals for the purpose of social shaming, monitoring and revenge. In such case of cyber witch hunting, personal information of the targeted individuals is often ruthlessly exposed and their lives are mercilessly disrupted. In the face of the growing resort to the human flesh search engine, the Beijing Court delivered the first ruling condemning this practice and affirming privacy rights for Chinese citizens at the end of 2008. This article discusses the trend of cyber-manhunt in China, with specific focus on the judgment of the Beijing Court. It points out the inadequacy in the ruling and argues that legislative enactment to protect personal information at the national level is essential in China. © 2009 Anne S. Y. Cheung.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Advanced Technology. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/422550/description?navopenmenu=-2en_US
dc.relation.ispartofComputer Law and Security Reviewen_US
dc.subjectChinaen_US
dc.subjectCyber Lynchingen_US
dc.subjectCyber-Manhunten_US
dc.subjectHuman Flesh Search Engineen_US
dc.subjectInterneten_US
dc.subjectIspen_US
dc.subjectPrivacyen_US
dc.titleChina Internet going wild: Cyber-hunting versus privacy protectionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailCheung, ASY: annechue@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, ASY=rp01243en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.clsr.2009.03.007en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-65549114440en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros157689-
dc.identifier.volume25en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage275en_US
dc.identifier.epage279en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, ASY=54400708000en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike5441418-

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