File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Novel approach for anterior chamber angle analysis: Anterior Chamber Angle Detection with Edge Measurement and Identification Algorithm (ACADEMIA)

TitleNovel approach for anterior chamber angle analysis: Anterior Chamber Angle Detection with Edge Measurement and Identification Algorithm (ACADEMIA)
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherAmerican Medical Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.archopthalmol.com
Citation
Archives Of Ophthalmology, 2006, v. 124 n. 10, p. 1395-1401 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To describe a novel approach to measuring anterior chamber angle dimensions and configurations. Methods: Sixty-nine images were selected randomly from the ultrasound biomicroscopic image database to develop the algorithm. Thirty images were selected for further analyses. The value of each pixel of the 8-bit grayscale ultrasound biomicroscopic images was quantized into 0 (black) or 1 (white), and the edge points outlining the angle were detected and fitted with straight lines. The dimensions and profiles of anterior chamber angles were then measured. Results: The algorithm failed to identify the edge points correctly in 8 (11.6%) of 69 images because of strong background noise. Three basic types of angle configuration were identified based on the derived angle profiles: constant, increasing, and decreasing, which corresponded to flat, bowed forward, and bowed backward iris contours, respectively. The angle measurements demonstrated high correlation with trabecular-iris angle and angle opening distance 500 (calculated as the distance from the corneal endothelium to the anterior iris surface perpendicular to a line drawn at 500 μm from the scleral spur). The strongest association was found between the averaged angle derived from the angle profile and the angle opening distance 500 (r=0.91). Conclusion: The proposed algorithm has high correlations with angle opening distance and trabecular-iris angle with the added advantages of being fully automated, reproducible, and able to capture the characteristic angle configurations. However, good-quality ultrasound biomicroscopic images with high signal-to-noise ratio are required to identify the edge points correctly. ©2006 American Medical Association. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/155890
ISSN
2014 Impact Factor: 4.399
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeung, CKSen_US
dc.contributor.authorYung, WHen_US
dc.contributor.authorYiu, CKFen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, SWen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, DYLen_US
dc.contributor.authorTse, RKKen_US
dc.contributor.authorTham, CCYen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, WMen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, DSCen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:38:13Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:38:13Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.citationArchives Of Ophthalmology, 2006, v. 124 n. 10, p. 1395-1401en_US
dc.identifier.issn0003-9950en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/155890-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To describe a novel approach to measuring anterior chamber angle dimensions and configurations. Methods: Sixty-nine images were selected randomly from the ultrasound biomicroscopic image database to develop the algorithm. Thirty images were selected for further analyses. The value of each pixel of the 8-bit grayscale ultrasound biomicroscopic images was quantized into 0 (black) or 1 (white), and the edge points outlining the angle were detected and fitted with straight lines. The dimensions and profiles of anterior chamber angles were then measured. Results: The algorithm failed to identify the edge points correctly in 8 (11.6%) of 69 images because of strong background noise. Three basic types of angle configuration were identified based on the derived angle profiles: constant, increasing, and decreasing, which corresponded to flat, bowed forward, and bowed backward iris contours, respectively. The angle measurements demonstrated high correlation with trabecular-iris angle and angle opening distance 500 (calculated as the distance from the corneal endothelium to the anterior iris surface perpendicular to a line drawn at 500 μm from the scleral spur). The strongest association was found between the averaged angle derived from the angle profile and the angle opening distance 500 (r=0.91). Conclusion: The proposed algorithm has high correlations with angle opening distance and trabecular-iris angle with the added advantages of being fully automated, reproducible, and able to capture the characteristic angle configurations. However, good-quality ultrasound biomicroscopic images with high signal-to-noise ratio are required to identify the edge points correctly. ©2006 American Medical Association. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Medical Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.archopthalmol.comen_US
dc.relation.ispartofArchives of Ophthalmologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAlgorithmsen_US
dc.subject.meshAnterior Chamber - Anatomy & Histology - Ultrasonographyen_US
dc.subject.meshCornea - Anatomy & Histology - Ultrasonographyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshImage Processing, Computer-Assisteden_US
dc.subject.meshIris - Anatomy & Histology - Ultrasonographyen_US
dc.subject.meshTrabecular Meshwork - Anatomy & Histology - Ultrasonographyen_US
dc.titleNovel approach for anterior chamber angle analysis: Anterior Chamber Angle Detection with Edge Measurement and Identification Algorithm (ACADEMIA)en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailYiu, CKF:cedric@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityYiu, CKF=rp00206en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1001/archopht.124.10.1395en_US
dc.identifier.pmid17030706-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33749566508en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33749566508&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume124en_US
dc.identifier.issue10en_US
dc.identifier.spage1395en_US
dc.identifier.epage1401en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000241057500002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, CKS=8834590400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYung, WH=7103137893en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYiu, CKF=24802813000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, SW=7402279310en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, DYL=13309931100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTse, RKK=8220164600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTham, CCY=36798095100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, WM=7403914485en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, DSC=35500200200en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats