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Article: High fidelity tonotopic mapping using swept source functional magnetic resonance imaging
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TitleHigh fidelity tonotopic mapping using swept source functional magnetic resonance imaging
 
AuthorsCheung, MM1 1
Lau, C1 1
Zhou, IY1 1
Chan, KC1 1
Zhang, JW1 1
Fan, SJ1 1
Wu, EX1 1 1 1
 
KeywordsFmri
Inferior Colliculus
Tonotopy
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ynimg
 
CitationNeuroimage, 2012, v. 61 n. 4, p. 978-986 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2012.03.031
 
AbstractTonotopy, the topographic encoding of sound frequency, is the fundamental property of the auditory system. Invasive techniques lack the spatial coverage or frequency resolution to rigorously investigate tonotopy. Conventional auditory fMRI is corrupted by significant image distortion, sporadic acoustic noise and inadequate frequency resolution. We developed an efficient and high fidelity auditory fMRI method that integrates continuous frequency sweeping stimulus, distortion free MRI sequence with stable scanner noise and Fourier analysis. We demonstrated this swept source imaging (SSI) in the rat inferior colliculus and obtained tonotopic maps with ~. 2. kHz resolution and 40. kHz bandwidth. The results were vastly superior to those obtained by conventional fMRI mapping approach and in excellent agreement with invasive findings. We applied SSI to examine tonotopic injury following developmental noise exposure and observed that the tonotopic organization was significantly disrupted. With SSI, we also observed the subtle effects of sound pressure level on tonotopic maps, reflecting the complex neuronal responses associated with asymmetric tuning curves. This in vivo and noninvasive technique will greatly facilitate future investigation of tonotopic plasticity and disorders and auditory information processing. SSI can also be adapted to study topographic organization in other sensory systems such as retinotopy and somatotopy. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.
 
ISSN1053-8119
2012 Impact Factor: 6.252
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.164
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2012.03.031
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000305920600026
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Hong Kong Research Grants CouncilHKU7826/10M
HKU7837/11M
Funding Information:

This work was supported by Hong Kong Research Grants Council (General research grants HKU7826/10M and HKU7837/11M to E.X.W.).

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorCheung, MM
 
dc.contributor.authorLau, C
 
dc.contributor.authorZhou, IY
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, KC
 
dc.contributor.authorZhang, JW
 
dc.contributor.authorFan, SJ
 
dc.contributor.authorWu, EX
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:35:13Z
 
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:35:13Z
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractTonotopy, the topographic encoding of sound frequency, is the fundamental property of the auditory system. Invasive techniques lack the spatial coverage or frequency resolution to rigorously investigate tonotopy. Conventional auditory fMRI is corrupted by significant image distortion, sporadic acoustic noise and inadequate frequency resolution. We developed an efficient and high fidelity auditory fMRI method that integrates continuous frequency sweeping stimulus, distortion free MRI sequence with stable scanner noise and Fourier analysis. We demonstrated this swept source imaging (SSI) in the rat inferior colliculus and obtained tonotopic maps with ~. 2. kHz resolution and 40. kHz bandwidth. The results were vastly superior to those obtained by conventional fMRI mapping approach and in excellent agreement with invasive findings. We applied SSI to examine tonotopic injury following developmental noise exposure and observed that the tonotopic organization was significantly disrupted. With SSI, we also observed the subtle effects of sound pressure level on tonotopic maps, reflecting the complex neuronal responses associated with asymmetric tuning curves. This in vivo and noninvasive technique will greatly facilitate future investigation of tonotopic plasticity and disorders and auditory information processing. SSI can also be adapted to study topographic organization in other sensory systems such as retinotopy and somatotopy. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationNeuroimage, 2012, v. 61 n. 4, p. 978-986 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2012.03.031
 
dc.identifier.citeulike10701608
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2012.03.031
 
dc.identifier.eissn1095-9572
 
dc.identifier.epage986
 
dc.identifier.hkuros225431
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000305920600026
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Hong Kong Research Grants CouncilHKU7826/10M
HKU7837/11M
Funding Information:

This work was supported by Hong Kong Research Grants Council (General research grants HKU7826/10M and HKU7837/11M to E.X.W.).

 
dc.identifier.issn1053-8119
2012 Impact Factor: 6.252
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.164
 
dc.identifier.issue4
 
dc.identifier.pmid22445952
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84861331599
 
dc.identifier.spage978
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/155761
 
dc.identifier.volume61
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ynimg
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofNeuroImage
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAcoustic Stimulation
 
dc.subject.meshAnimals
 
dc.subject.meshAuditory Perception - physiology
 
dc.subject.meshBrain Mapping - methods
 
dc.subject.meshImage Processing, Computer-Assisted - methods
 
dc.subject.meshInferior Colliculi - physiology
 
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imaging - methods
 
dc.subject.meshRats
 
dc.subject.meshRats, Sprague-Dawley
 
dc.subjectFmri
 
dc.subjectInferior Colliculus
 
dc.subjectTonotopy
 
dc.titleHigh fidelity tonotopic mapping using swept source functional magnetic resonance imaging
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong