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Article: Effect of cerebrovascular changes on brain DTI quantitation: a hypercapnia study

TitleEffect of cerebrovascular changes on brain DTI quantitation: a hypercapnia study
Authors
KeywordsCerebrovasculature
Diffusivity
Dti
Hemodynamics
Hypercapnia
Quantitation
Issue Date2012
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/mri
Citation
Magnetic Resonance Imaging, 2012 How to Cite?
AbstractQuantitative diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) offers a valuable tool to probe the microstructural changes in neural tissues in vivo, where absolute quantitation accuracy and reproducibility are essential. It has been long recognized that measurement of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) using DTI could be influenced by the presence of water molecules in cerebrovasculature. However, little is known about to what extent such blood signal affects DTI quantitation. In this study, we quantitatively examined the effect of cerebral hemodynamic change on DTI indices by using a standard multislice echo planar imaging (EPI) spin echo (SE) DTI acquisition protocol and a rat model of hypercapnia. In response to 5% CO 2 challenge, mean, radial and axial diffusivities measured with diffusion factor (b-value) of b=1.0 ms/μm 2 were found to increase in whole brain (1.52%±0.22%, 1.66%±0.16% and 1.35%±0.37%, respectively), gray matter (1.56%±0.23%, 1.63%±0.14% and 1.47%±0.45%, respectively) and white matter regions (1.45%±0.28%, 1.88%±0.33% and 1.10%±0.26%, respectively). Fractional anisotropy (FA) was found to decrease by 1.67%±0.38%, 1.91%±0.59% and 1.46%±0.30% in whole brain, gray matter and white matter regions, respectively. In addition, these diffusivity increases and FA decreases became more pronounced at a lower b-value (b=0.3 ms/μm 2). The results indicated that in vivo DTI quantitation in brain can be contaminated by vascular factors on the order of few percentages. Consequently, alterations in cerebrovasculature and hemodynamics can affect the DTI quantitation and its efficacy in characterizing the neural tissue microstructures in normal and diseased states. Caution should be taken in designing and interpreting quantitative DTI studies as all DTI indices can be potentially confounded by physiologic conditions and by cerebrovascular and hemodynamic characteristics. © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/155745
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.98
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.139
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDing, AYen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, KCen_US
dc.contributor.authorWu, EXen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:35:08Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:35:08Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationMagnetic Resonance Imaging, 2012en_US
dc.identifier.issn0730-725Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/155745-
dc.description.abstractQuantitative diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) offers a valuable tool to probe the microstructural changes in neural tissues in vivo, where absolute quantitation accuracy and reproducibility are essential. It has been long recognized that measurement of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) using DTI could be influenced by the presence of water molecules in cerebrovasculature. However, little is known about to what extent such blood signal affects DTI quantitation. In this study, we quantitatively examined the effect of cerebral hemodynamic change on DTI indices by using a standard multislice echo planar imaging (EPI) spin echo (SE) DTI acquisition protocol and a rat model of hypercapnia. In response to 5% CO 2 challenge, mean, radial and axial diffusivities measured with diffusion factor (b-value) of b=1.0 ms/μm 2 were found to increase in whole brain (1.52%±0.22%, 1.66%±0.16% and 1.35%±0.37%, respectively), gray matter (1.56%±0.23%, 1.63%±0.14% and 1.47%±0.45%, respectively) and white matter regions (1.45%±0.28%, 1.88%±0.33% and 1.10%±0.26%, respectively). Fractional anisotropy (FA) was found to decrease by 1.67%±0.38%, 1.91%±0.59% and 1.46%±0.30% in whole brain, gray matter and white matter regions, respectively. In addition, these diffusivity increases and FA decreases became more pronounced at a lower b-value (b=0.3 ms/μm 2). The results indicated that in vivo DTI quantitation in brain can be contaminated by vascular factors on the order of few percentages. Consequently, alterations in cerebrovasculature and hemodynamics can affect the DTI quantitation and its efficacy in characterizing the neural tissue microstructures in normal and diseased states. Caution should be taken in designing and interpreting quantitative DTI studies as all DTI indices can be potentially confounded by physiologic conditions and by cerebrovascular and hemodynamic characteristics. © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/mrien_US
dc.relation.ispartofMagnetic Resonance Imagingen_US
dc.subjectCerebrovasculatureen_US
dc.subjectDiffusivityen_US
dc.subjectDtien_US
dc.subjectHemodynamicsen_US
dc.subjectHypercapniaen_US
dc.subjectQuantitationen_US
dc.titleEffect of cerebrovascular changes on brain DTI quantitation: a hypercapnia studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWu, EX:ewu1@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWu, EX=rp00193en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.mri.2012.02.012en_US
dc.identifier.pmid22495243-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84864006582-
dc.identifier.hkuros225430-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000306873300010-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDing, AY=35745892100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, KC=34968940300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWu, EX=7202128034en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike10551703-

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