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Article: Learning and memory alterations are associated with hippocampal N-acetylaspartate in a rate model of depression as measured by H-MRS
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TitleLearning and memory alterations are associated with hippocampal N-acetylaspartate in a rate model of depression as measured by H-MRS
 
AuthorsXi, G3
Hui, J3
Zhang, Z3
Liu, S3
Zhang, X3
Teng, G3
Chan, KC2
Wu, EX2
Nie, B4
Shan, B4
Li, L1
Reynolds, GP5
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.action
 
CitationPLoS One, 2011, v. 6 n. 12, article no. e28686 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0028686
 
AbstractIt is generally accepted that cognitive processes, such as learning and memory, are affected in depression. The present study used a rat model of depression, chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS), to determine whether hippocampal volume and neurochemical changes were involved in learning and memory alterations. A further aim was to determine whether these effects could be ameliorated by escitalopram treatment, as assessed with the non-invasive techniques of structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Our results demonstrated that CUMS had a dramatic influence on spatial cognitive performance in the Morris water maze task, and CUMS reduced the concentration of neuronal marker N-acetylaspartate (NAA) in the hippocampus. These effects could be significantly reversed by repeated administration of escitalopram. However, neither chronic stress nor escitalopram treatment influenced hippocampal volume. Of note, the learning and memory alterations of the rats were associated with right hippocampal NAA concentration. Our results indicate that in depression, NAA may be a more sensitive measure of cognitive function than hippocampal volume.
 
ISSN1932-6203
2012 Impact Factor: 3.73
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.512
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0028686
 
PubMed Central IDPMC3237477
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000298369100078
Funding AgencyGrant Number
National Natural Science Foundation of China30770779
30825014
30830046
National Basic Research Program of China (973 Program)2007CB512308
2009CB918303
National Hi-Tech Research and Development Program of China (863 Program)2008AA02Z413
Funding Information:

This research was partly supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 30770779 and No. 30825014 to ZZ; No. 30830046 to LL), National Basic Research Program of China (973 Program) (No. 2007CB512308 to ZZ; No. 2009CB918303 to LL) and National Hi-Tech Research and Development Program of China (863 Program) (No. 2008AA02Z413 to ZZ). No additional external funding received for this study. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorXi, G
 
dc.contributor.authorHui, J
 
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Z
 
dc.contributor.authorLiu, S
 
dc.contributor.authorZhang, X
 
dc.contributor.authorTeng, G
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, KC
 
dc.contributor.authorWu, EX
 
dc.contributor.authorNie, B
 
dc.contributor.authorShan, B
 
dc.contributor.authorLi, L
 
dc.contributor.authorReynolds, GP
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:34:56Z
 
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:34:56Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractIt is generally accepted that cognitive processes, such as learning and memory, are affected in depression. The present study used a rat model of depression, chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS), to determine whether hippocampal volume and neurochemical changes were involved in learning and memory alterations. A further aim was to determine whether these effects could be ameliorated by escitalopram treatment, as assessed with the non-invasive techniques of structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Our results demonstrated that CUMS had a dramatic influence on spatial cognitive performance in the Morris water maze task, and CUMS reduced the concentration of neuronal marker N-acetylaspartate (NAA) in the hippocampus. These effects could be significantly reversed by repeated administration of escitalopram. However, neither chronic stress nor escitalopram treatment influenced hippocampal volume. Of note, the learning and memory alterations of the rats were associated with right hippocampal NAA concentration. Our results indicate that in depression, NAA may be a more sensitive measure of cognitive function than hippocampal volume.
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.identifier.citationPLoS One, 2011, v. 6 n. 12, article no. e28686 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0028686
 
dc.identifier.citeulike10209016
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0028686
 
dc.identifier.hkuros206809
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000298369100078
Funding AgencyGrant Number
National Natural Science Foundation of China30770779
30825014
30830046
National Basic Research Program of China (973 Program)2007CB512308
2009CB918303
National Hi-Tech Research and Development Program of China (863 Program)2008AA02Z413
Funding Information:

This research was partly supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 30770779 and No. 30825014 to ZZ; No. 30830046 to LL), National Basic Research Program of China (973 Program) (No. 2007CB512308 to ZZ; No. 2009CB918303 to LL) and National Hi-Tech Research and Development Program of China (863 Program) (No. 2008AA02Z413 to ZZ). No additional external funding received for this study. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

 
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
2012 Impact Factor: 3.73
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.512
 
dc.identifier.issue12, article no. e28686
 
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3237477
 
dc.identifier.pmid22194886
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-83355172820
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/155709
 
dc.identifier.volume6
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.action
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS One
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.subject.meshAspartic Acid - analogs and derivatives - metabolism
 
dc.subject.meshDepression - complications - drug therapy - metabolism - physiopathology
 
dc.subject.meshHippocampus - drug effects - metabolism - pathology - physiopathology
 
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
 
dc.subject.meshMemory - drug effects - physiology
 
dc.titleLearning and memory alterations are associated with hippocampal N-acetylaspartate in a rate model of depression as measured by H-MRS
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Zhang, X</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Teng, G</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Chan, KC</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Wu, EX</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Nie, B</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Shan, B</contributor.author>
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Author Affiliations
  1. Second Xiangya Hospital of Central-South University
  2. The University of Hong Kong
  3. Southeast University
  4. Institute of High Energy Physics Chinese Academy of Science
  5. Sheffield Hallam University