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Article: Ancient Chinese medicine and mechanistic evidence of acupuncture physiology

TitleAncient Chinese medicine and mechanistic evidence of acupuncture physiology
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherSpringer. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00424/index.htm
Citation
Pflugers Archiv European Journal Of Physiology, 2011, v. 462 n. 5, p. 645-653 How to Cite?
AbstractAcupuncture has been widely used in China for three millennia as an art of healing. Yet, its physiology is not yet understood. The current interest in acupuncture started in 1971. Soon afterward, extensive research led to the concept of neural signaling with possible involvement of opioid peptides, glutamate, adenosine and identifying responsive parts in the central nervous system. In the last decade scientists began investigating the subject with anatomical and molecular imaging. It was found that mechanical movements of the needle, ignored in the past, appear to be central to the method and intracellular calcium ions may play a pivotal role. In this review, we trace the technique of clinical treatment from the first written record about 2,200 years ago to the modern time. The ancient texts have been used to introduce the concepts of yin, yang, qi, de qi, and meridians, the traditional foundation of acupuncture. We explore the sequence of the physiological process, from the turning of the needle, the mechanical wave activation of calcium ion channel to beta-endorphin secretion. By using modern terminology to re-interpret the ancient texts, we have found that the 2nd century b.c. physiologists were meticulous investigators and their explanation fits well with the mechanistic model derived from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and confocal microscopy. In conclusion, the ancient model appears to have withstood the test of time surprisingly well confirming the popular axiom that the old wine is better than the new. © 2011 The Author(s).
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/155678
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.654
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.638
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYang, ESen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, PWen_US
dc.contributor.authorNilius, Ben_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, Gen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:34:47Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:34:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationPflugers Archiv European Journal Of Physiology, 2011, v. 462 n. 5, p. 645-653en_US
dc.identifier.issn0031-6768en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/155678-
dc.description.abstractAcupuncture has been widely used in China for three millennia as an art of healing. Yet, its physiology is not yet understood. The current interest in acupuncture started in 1971. Soon afterward, extensive research led to the concept of neural signaling with possible involvement of opioid peptides, glutamate, adenosine and identifying responsive parts in the central nervous system. In the last decade scientists began investigating the subject with anatomical and molecular imaging. It was found that mechanical movements of the needle, ignored in the past, appear to be central to the method and intracellular calcium ions may play a pivotal role. In this review, we trace the technique of clinical treatment from the first written record about 2,200 years ago to the modern time. The ancient texts have been used to introduce the concepts of yin, yang, qi, de qi, and meridians, the traditional foundation of acupuncture. We explore the sequence of the physiological process, from the turning of the needle, the mechanical wave activation of calcium ion channel to beta-endorphin secretion. By using modern terminology to re-interpret the ancient texts, we have found that the 2nd century b.c. physiologists were meticulous investigators and their explanation fits well with the mechanistic model derived from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and confocal microscopy. In conclusion, the ancient model appears to have withstood the test of time surprisingly well confirming the popular axiom that the old wine is better than the new. © 2011 The Author(s).en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00424/index.htmen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPflugers Archiv European Journal of Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAcupunctureen_US
dc.subject.meshAcupuncture Analgesia - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshBiomechanics - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCalcium Channels - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCalcium Signaling - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshChinaen_US
dc.subject.meshElasticity Imaging Techniquesen_US
dc.subject.meshHistory, Ancienten_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imagingen_US
dc.subject.meshMedicine, Chinese Traditional - Historyen_US
dc.subject.meshMeridiansen_US
dc.subject.meshNerve Fibers - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshNeurons, Afferent - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshQien_US
dc.subject.meshRandomized Controlled Trials As Topicen_US
dc.subject.meshYin-Yangen_US
dc.titleAncient Chinese medicine and mechanistic evidence of acupuncture physiologyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailYang, ES:esyang@hkueee.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityYang, ES=rp00199en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00424-011-1017-3en_US
dc.identifier.pmid21870056-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80054737689en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-80054737689&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume462en_US
dc.identifier.issue5en_US
dc.identifier.spage645en_US
dc.identifier.epage653en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000299153000002-
dc.publisher.placeGermanyen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYang, ES=7202021229en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, PW=24329872200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNilius, B=7102169854en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, G=53863909100en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike9760835-

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