File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: An fMRI study of acupuncture-induced brain activation of aphasia stroke patients

TitleAn fMRI study of acupuncture-induced brain activation of aphasia stroke patients
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherChurchill Livingstone. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/issn/09652299
Citation
Complementary Therapies In Medicine, 2011, v. 19 SUPPL. 1, p. S49-S59 How to Cite?
AbstractThis investigation aims to test the effect of acupuncture on word generation activation (WGA) in post-stroke aphasia patients. Seven vascular aphasia patients and 14 control subjects were studied using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Each performed: (1) a word generation (WG) task alone, followed by (2) repeating WG after insertion of acupuncture needles (WGN) into SJ 8 (a language-implicated acupoint), followed by (3) repeating WGN reinforced by electrical stimulation (WGA) of SJ 8, and finally (4) electrical stimulation (ES) of SJ 8 alone. Significant activation was found in the opercular, triangular, or insula during the ES stimulation in patients when comparing each patient to 14 normal controls. For the WG task, significant activation was found in the inferior frontal gyrus when comparing each patient to 14 normal controls. The signal induced by acupuncture was larger than that of the WG task in the left middle frontal gyrus with the comparison of WGA vs. WGN in seven patients. Further, main significant effects in the right insula in patients were observed when comparing seven patients to 14 normal controls. The activation induced by ES stimulation was only found on the left side in controls. This activation was observed on the lesion side of superior and middle frontal gyrus (SMFG) in patients. This study demonstrates for the first time that language-deficit-implicated acupoint stimulation can selectively activate the brain on the lesion side in post-stroke aphasia patients. These results suggest that acupuncture may have therapeutic benefits in post-stroke aphasia patients. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/155595
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.935
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.649
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Hong Kong Jockey Club Charities Trust
Funding Information:

This work was supported by grants from The Hong Kong Jockey Club Charities Trust. We deeply appreciate the kindness of Dr. Cathy J. Price from Wellcome Department, Cognitive Neurology, Institute of Neurology, University College London for a critical review as well as valuable suggestions in the fMRI data analysis and interpretation.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorYang, ESen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:34:16Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:34:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationComplementary Therapies In Medicine, 2011, v. 19 SUPPL. 1, p. S49-S59en_US
dc.identifier.issn0965-2299en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/155595-
dc.description.abstractThis investigation aims to test the effect of acupuncture on word generation activation (WGA) in post-stroke aphasia patients. Seven vascular aphasia patients and 14 control subjects were studied using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Each performed: (1) a word generation (WG) task alone, followed by (2) repeating WG after insertion of acupuncture needles (WGN) into SJ 8 (a language-implicated acupoint), followed by (3) repeating WGN reinforced by electrical stimulation (WGA) of SJ 8, and finally (4) electrical stimulation (ES) of SJ 8 alone. Significant activation was found in the opercular, triangular, or insula during the ES stimulation in patients when comparing each patient to 14 normal controls. For the WG task, significant activation was found in the inferior frontal gyrus when comparing each patient to 14 normal controls. The signal induced by acupuncture was larger than that of the WG task in the left middle frontal gyrus with the comparison of WGA vs. WGN in seven patients. Further, main significant effects in the right insula in patients were observed when comparing seven patients to 14 normal controls. The activation induced by ES stimulation was only found on the left side in controls. This activation was observed on the lesion side of superior and middle frontal gyrus (SMFG) in patients. This study demonstrates for the first time that language-deficit-implicated acupoint stimulation can selectively activate the brain on the lesion side in post-stroke aphasia patients. These results suggest that acupuncture may have therapeutic benefits in post-stroke aphasia patients. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherChurchill Livingstone. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/issn/09652299en_US
dc.relation.ispartofComplementary Therapies in Medicineen_US
dc.subject.meshAcupuncture Pointsen_US
dc.subject.meshAcupuncture Therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAphasia - Etiology - Physiopathology - Therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshBrain - Pathology - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshBrain Mappingen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshLanguageen_US
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imaging - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshStroke - Pathology - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.titleAn fMRI study of acupuncture-induced brain activation of aphasia stroke patientsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailYang, ES:esyang@hkueee.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityYang, ES=rp00199en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ctim.2010.11.004en_US
dc.identifier.pmid21195295-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-78650677743en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-78650677743&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume19en_US
dc.identifier.issueSUPPL. 1en_US
dc.identifier.spageS49en_US
dc.identifier.epageS59en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000287646400008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, G=35767974200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYang, ES=7202021229en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike10439208-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats