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Article: Advances in magnetometry through miniaturization

TitleAdvances in magnetometry through miniaturization
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherAmerican Vacuum Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://ojps.aip.org/jvsta/
Citation
Journal Of Vacuum Science And Technology A: Vacuum, Surfaces And Films, 2008, v. 26 n. 4, p. 757-762 How to Cite?
AbstractRecent innovations may lead to magnetic sensors that are smaller, more sensitive, and/or cost less than current magnetometers. Examples of this are the chip scale atomic magnetometer, magnetic tunnel junctions with MgO barriers, and a device for minimizing the effect of 1f noise, the microelectromechanical system (MEMS) flux concentrator. In the chip scale atomic magnetometer, researchers have been able to fabricate the light source, optics, heater, optical cell, and photodiode detector in a stack that passes through a silicon wafer. Theoretical and subsequent experimental work has led to the observation of magnetoresistance values of 400% at room temperature in magnetic tunnel junctions with MgO barriers. This large magnetoresistance occurs because electrons in the majority band can tunnel more easily through the MgO barrier than electrons in the minority band. The MEMS flux concentrator has the potential to increase the sensitivity of magnetic sensors at low frequencies by more than an order of magnitude. The MEMS flux concentrator does this by shifting the operating frequency to higher frequencies where the 1f noise is much smaller. The shift occurs because the motion of flux concentrators on MEMS flaps modulates the field at kilohertz frequencies at the position of the sensor. Though miniaturization is generally beneficial, trade-offs are necessary because some properties, such as noise, worsen with decreasing size. © 2008 American Vacuum Society.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/155478
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.724
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.339
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorEdelstein, ASen_US
dc.contributor.authorBurnette, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorFischer, GAen_US
dc.contributor.authorCheng, SFen_US
dc.contributor.authorEgelhoff, WFen_US
dc.contributor.authorPong, PWTen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcmichael, RDen_US
dc.contributor.authorNowak, ERen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:33:42Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:33:42Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Vacuum Science And Technology A: Vacuum, Surfaces And Films, 2008, v. 26 n. 4, p. 757-762en_US
dc.identifier.issn0734-2101en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/155478-
dc.description.abstractRecent innovations may lead to magnetic sensors that are smaller, more sensitive, and/or cost less than current magnetometers. Examples of this are the chip scale atomic magnetometer, magnetic tunnel junctions with MgO barriers, and a device for minimizing the effect of 1f noise, the microelectromechanical system (MEMS) flux concentrator. In the chip scale atomic magnetometer, researchers have been able to fabricate the light source, optics, heater, optical cell, and photodiode detector in a stack that passes through a silicon wafer. Theoretical and subsequent experimental work has led to the observation of magnetoresistance values of 400% at room temperature in magnetic tunnel junctions with MgO barriers. This large magnetoresistance occurs because electrons in the majority band can tunnel more easily through the MgO barrier than electrons in the minority band. The MEMS flux concentrator has the potential to increase the sensitivity of magnetic sensors at low frequencies by more than an order of magnitude. The MEMS flux concentrator does this by shifting the operating frequency to higher frequencies where the 1f noise is much smaller. The shift occurs because the motion of flux concentrators on MEMS flaps modulates the field at kilohertz frequencies at the position of the sensor. Though miniaturization is generally beneficial, trade-offs are necessary because some properties, such as noise, worsen with decreasing size. © 2008 American Vacuum Society.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Vacuum Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://ojps.aip.org/jvsta/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Vacuum Science and Technology A: Vacuum, Surfaces and Filmsen_US
dc.titleAdvances in magnetometry through miniaturizationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailPong, PWT:ppong@eee.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityPong, PWT=rp00217en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1116/1.2841516en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-46649088363en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-46649088363&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume26en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage757en_US
dc.identifier.epage762en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000257424200034-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridEdelstein, AS=35239898100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBurnette, J=8586360600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFischer, GA=13606821000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, SF=7404681591en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridEgelhoff, WF=7006151986en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPong, PWT=24071267900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcMichael, RD=7007083420en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNowak, ER=7103283674en_US

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